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Selective focus


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#1 Joe Baron

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 04:27 PM

Quick question:

I worked on a film a few years ago that a friend of mine (whom I can't get in touch with) DPed. There were a number of shots in the film where he played with the focus by holding a piece of glass (I suppose a lens of some sort) in front of the camera's lens. When he moved it around, it would alter the focal range in an unnatural way, often creating focal differences on the same focal plane.

Does anyone know the name/technique that he was using? Is there an actual lens that can achieve this effect (other than a split-field lens)?

Thanks!
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#2 Joe Baron

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 06:13 PM

Hello? Anyone?

Maybe I posted this in the wrong section... Or maybe no one's up to the challenge! Ha!
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#3 Thomas Tamura

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 06:43 PM

my friend is a wedding photographer and she has a lens attachment that produdces the effect you're describing. I don't recall the name of it, and I havn't been able to get a hold of her. It's out there -- and it has a name. Keep looking.
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#4 Joe Baron

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 07:32 PM

You might be thinking of a soft focus lens (which I'm pretty sure if commonly used in wedding photography). If that's the case then I'm looking for something else. Thanks though.
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#5 Brian Dzyak

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 09:13 PM

It's a Mezmerizer lens that can accomplish that effect.
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#6 Joe Baron

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 12:22 AM

Great, thanks!
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#7 Daniel Stigler

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 03:00 AM

You can also try and use a split-diopter.
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#8 Nick G Smith

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 03:35 AM

You can try holding very simple glass lenses in front of the taking lens and move it in and out to create various effects. I have used a glass ruler before which creates a wonderful shimmering effect when passed across the lens. You can buy some basic lens packs for schools - sometimes they are plastic, and play around with them, problem is usually they are kind of small. Glass manufacturers such as Pilkington are a good place to look as they may have some simple glass lenses for sale. Also check out: http://www.ccjxoptic.com/index2.htm
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#9 boy yniguez

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 02:40 AM

any clear. non-flat piece of glass would distort your image if placed infront of the lens. i used to use bottles, drinking glasses, even glass candle holders to alter portions of the image.
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#10 Christophe Collette

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 07:14 PM

Hi! You should rent a swing-shift system with lenses, you'd have exactly the effect you are after (in photography it's called anti-schempflug) without compromising quality. But I also have seen a video made on a small budget where the Dp used a device like the one your friend used, I just don't know what it is called though.
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#11 Greg Gross

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:52 PM

Example- Everything in frame in focus except the actors's face. Example- Face in focus with medium
close-up,background out of focus. You may want to make the actor's face more prominent in the pic-
ture than anything else. Inversely you may want everything in frame more prominent than the actor's
face. Selective focus may be utilized with reflectors,diffusers to create desired effect.

"You know...that a blank wall is an appalling thing to look at. The wall of a museum-a canvas-a piece
of film-or a guy sitting in front of a typewriter. Then, you start out to do something-that vague thing
called creation. The beginning strikes awe within you."

_Edward Steichen


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Aerial Filmworks

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CineLab

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Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Opal

Technodolly