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Noisegate to cut camera noise?


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#1 Rob.m.Neilson

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 07:46 PM

I shot a scene in my film inside a small limo, and despite the sound blanket I still have some camera noise at the top of the fresh mags. What can I do with noisegate to cut this down as much as possible?
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#2 darrin p nim

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 08:15 PM

rent or buy a barney. its a sound deadening cover for cameras, you will most likely have to rent one specifically for the camera. Ive hear of people using dynamat in some sort of way, i dont know how practical that is.
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#3 Rob.m.Neilson

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 08:24 PM

rent or buy a barney. its a sound deadening cover for cameras, you will most likely have to rent one specifically for the camera. Ive hear of people using dynamat in some sort of way, i dont know how practical that is.


We had a barney, as well as a soundblanket over the camera yet we still ended up with mag noise...the acoustics inside that car were pretty amazing. you could play a good game of telephone.
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#4 Daniel Smith

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 11:33 AM

If you can get hold of Adobe Audition there's a noise cancellation feature in it, you basically train it by playing back a wave with just the background noise, and then the program detects what frequencies there are inside it and removes them but leaves the rest. Works pretty well actually.

Although, don't expect the sound you want to come out 100% perfect.

It just depends on what frequencies the background noise is using as to how good the sound you want will come out. (for instance if a background frequency is similar to that of the sound you want it will strip both)

But it's always best to get the best sound possible on set as opposed to fixing it later in post.

If you really want, send me an MP3 of the clip and I'll see if I can do anything to it, if I can, send me the raw video and audio with timecode stamps prefferably and I'll master the whole thing. Free of charge, but a place in the credits.

If you don't like what's been done to it, there's no obligation to say yes. So it's a win situation either way.

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 29 September 2006 - 11:34 AM.

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#5 dr_gonzo

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 05:33 PM

If you can get hold of Adobe Audition there's a noise cancellation feature in it, you basically train it by playing back a wave with just the background noise, and then the program detects what frequencies there are inside it and removes them but leaves the rest. Works pretty well actually.

Although, don't expect the sound you want to come out 100% perfect.

It just depends on what frequencies the background noise is using as to how good the sound you want will come out. (for instance if a background frequency is similar to that of the sound you want it will strip both)

But it's always best to get the best sound possible on set as opposed to fixing it later in post.

If you really want, send me an MP3 of the clip and I'll see if I can do anything to it, if I can, send me the raw video and audio with timecode stamps prefferably and I'll master the whole thing. Free of charge, but a place in the credits.

If you don't like what's been done to it, there's no obligation to say yes. So it's a win situation either way.



What is Adobe Audition, Ive never heard of it?

Edited by dr_gonzo, 29 September 2006 - 05:34 PM.

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#6 Rob.m.Neilson

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 05:36 PM

What is Adobe Audition, Ive never heard of it?



Thanks Daniel, I may take you up on that offer! Lemme just get my rough cut finished first and Ill play around to see if I can remove the frequency of the camera in the background.
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#7 Daniel Smith

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 06:59 PM

Thanks Daniel, I may take you up on that offer! Lemme just get my rough cut finished first and Ill play around to see if I can remove the frequency of the camera in the background.

No problem. There is without a doubt other great software out there you can use to do this with, I just personally use Adobe Auditon and find it works great.

Bare in mind that if we were to set something up where I mastered the audio, we would probably need to do most stuff through post. As I would send you the audio in 96KHz 24bit, raw, format, to preserve the best audio quality. (We might be talking gigabytes of audio)

It's usually good to process all of the audio anyway, not just one part. Increase volume of important key words and sentences (will increase the meaning), and generally just clean everything up. I usually find you can make the vocals sound a lot better with a few basic EQ adjustments and filters.

Things that just can't be done practically on set.

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 30 September 2006 - 06:59 PM.

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#8 Rob.m.Neilson

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 07:15 PM

No problem. There is without a doubt other great software out there you can use to do this with, I just personally use Adobe Auditon and find it works great.

Bare in mind that if we were to set something up where I mastered the audio, we would probably need to do most stuff through post. As I would send you the audio in 96KHz 24bit, raw, format, to preserve the best audio quality. (We might be talking gigabytes of audio)

It's usually good to process all of the audio anyway, not just one part. Increase volume of important key words and sentences (will increase the meaning), and generally just clean everything up. I usually find you can make the vocals sound a lot better with a few basic EQ adjustments and filters.

Things that just can't be done practically on set.


It was actually really simple, just putting on the noisegate filter, and putting (i cant remember which setting) from 1 to 2 did it all....


Now I just have to figure out a way to fix my clipped audio if that is even possible without ADR. The soundman i used is a great friend, but was a little too green for this project.
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#9 Daniel Sheehy

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 07:37 PM

Now I just have to figure out a way to fix my clipped audio if that is even possible without ADR.


Now that won't be as easy!!
Once it's clipped its gone. There may be software to try & extrapolate the missing data, but if it is clipped badly you're probably better off going with the ADR.
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#10 Daniel Smith

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 12:16 PM

I don't know how you would fill in the clipped audio, but making ADR look good is a sod in itself.

Just make sure you save backups of everything before you edit this stuff.
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#11 dr_gonzo

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 02:10 PM

I don't know how you would fill in the clipped audio, but making ADR look good is a sod in itself.

Just make sure you save backups of everything before you edit this stuff.


Luckily the ADR for this scene is just a guy screaming in despair. I hate to ADR it since his performance on set was so good, but Ill see what I can make work.

Im also going to shoot a pickup shot with my shitty K3 camera and then record ADR on my mini DV camera. I figure it wont go out of sync since this is literally for a 2 or 3 second extreme close up pickup. I Just hope the 16 footage can mix decently with the S16.
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