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#1 Hau-Jou Chiou

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 10:15 AM

Does anybody know the difference between reflex bolex and non-reflex bolex in operation of camera?
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#2 Zachary Vex

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 02:45 PM

when using the reflex-type Bolex cameras your view shows exactly what the lens sees, so you don't have to worry about parallax problems you get with a non-reflex viewfinder.

if you use a non-reflex viewfinder, you have to adjust the distance to the subject using the small wheel on the bottom of the eyepiece (which moves the eyepiece to align your view more properly with that of the lens) and you have to make sure you've selected the proper length on the viewfinder as well (there are levers on some models with numbers that should match the length of the taking lens, other models have these black frames that flip into place, also numbered to match your lenses.)

so there are two extra things to worry about when using a non-reflex viewfinder... when you set your focus, match that number using the little wheel on the bottom of the eyepiece, and select the length on the viewfinder each time you change lenses.
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#3 Nick Mulder

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 08:24 PM

Does anybody know the difference between reflex bolex and non-reflex bolex in operation of camera?


non-reflex Bolexs are good for some uses as they dont have the problems associated with light loss that the reflex models do...

To get the image up into the viewfinder there is a prism that reflects around %25 of the light (I cant remember the exact amount) upwards into the ground glass that you focus with ...

Because of this the viewfinder can be very dim, especially with the lens stopped down - Again, due to this prism a new range of lenses was developed to adjust for the focal 'upset' they caused, they are especially required when shooting wider focal lengths with an open iris - it is possible to get away with longer focal lengths when stopped down but you may as well get the proper 'RX' switars to be sure...

Non-reflexs are or at least were often used in animation set ups...
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#4 Hau-Jou Chiou

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 11:17 PM

Thank you for yuor answer and let me know more about BOLEX.
But I have another question, some type BOLEX have variable shutter, what that mean?
it can change three mode only, how does it work? and will make some effect on image?
Is that like change shutter angle?
And does BOLEX has mirror shutter like Arriflex or not?
Thank you.
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#5 Hau-Jou Chiou

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 11:50 PM

Thank you for yuor answer and let me know more about BOLEX.
But I have another question, some type BOLEX have variable shutter, what that mean?
it can change three mode only, how does it work? and will make some effect on image?
Is that like change shutter angle?
And does BOLEX has mirror shutter like Arriflex or not?
Thank you.



And could anyone or any place could change the Bolex which only use 100 feet film to use 400 feet magzine?
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#6 Nick Mulder

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 04:40 AM

Thank you for yuor answer and let me know more about BOLEX.
But I have another question, some type BOLEX have variable shutter, what that mean?
it can change three mode only, how does it work? and will make some effect on image?
Is that like change shutter angle?
And does BOLEX has mirror shutter like Arriflex or not?
Thank you.


I've already answered your second question - dont want to moan too much, but the answers to all your questions can be (easily) found online, if not all here in these forums already...

try searching.

your question re. 100ft bolex to use 400ft mag - well, if you had a an RX4 or SB then they would require the spill proof hole and mount at the top of the body to be built , you would need all the same motors and power for them as the usual RX5/SBM systems ...

It would either be ugly or expensive (ie. not worth it)
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#7 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 03:11 PM

The thing about the Bolex that I never cared for is that there is no registration pin. Back in the days when I had some loading issues :o I had a few rolls of B&W neg that simply got "pushed" through the gate at a slower rate than normal. Everything sounded fine when I was shooting. It was only when I brought it to the lab that it was discovered that the entire roll had a smearing effect. Luckily the lab was smart enough not to print anything.

Also, the Non-Reflex Bolex has a beam-splitter as opposed to a mirror-shutter (Arriflex.) Correct me if my explanation is off, but the beam-splitter does exactly that...splits the light between what is hitting the film plane and what is being directed to the viewfinder. Since you have a loss of light here, you need to open up the iris to compensate.

The Bolex is a cool camera...no question. The big appeal for me is that it is spring-wound. No need for a power source, which makes it extremely versatile. The Arri S is quite idiot-proof: registration pin, mirror-shutter, but ALWAYS requires juice.

For people who are just starting out and looking for something to learn on, the Bolex is cheaper (even the Rex 5) and one of the most commonly used 16mm cameras. That should tell you something. And, yes, the Arri S and certain Bolex models take the 400' mag.

I just got comfortable with the Arri S since i was always renting it. So I bought one. :D

Edited by Bill DiPietra, 29 September 2006 - 03:13 PM.

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#8 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 03:28 PM

Also, the Non-Reflex Bolex has a beam-splitter as opposed to a mirror-shutter (Arriflex.) Correct me if my explanation is off, but the beam-splitter does exactly that...splits the light between what is hitting the film plane and what is being directed to the viewfinder. Since you have a loss of light here, you need to open up the iris to compensate.


Scratch that...as someone stated above, it's the reflexive Bolexes that have the light loss issues. Damn, it's been a while! :blink:

Sorry for the initial misinformation.

Edited by Bill DiPietra, 29 September 2006 - 03:30 PM.

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#9 Hau-Jou Chiou

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 09:09 PM

The Bolex is a cool camera...no question. The big appeal for me is that it is spring-wound. No need for a power source, which makes it extremely versatile. The Arri S is quite idiot-proof: registration pin, mirror-shutter, but ALWAYS requires juice.

For people who are just starting out and looking for something to learn on, the Bolex is cheaper (even the Rex 5) and one of the most commonly used 16mm cameras. That should tell you something. And, yes, the Arri S and certain Bolex models take the 400' mag.

I just got comfortable with the Arri S since i was always renting it. So I bought one. :D



I heard about Arriflex is a very noisy camera? What do you think aboout it? Does it louder than Bolex?
I have a Beaulieu R16, when I tested in my school with Bolex, they all run in 24fps, but R16's sound is louder than Bolex.
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#10 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 11:13 PM

I heard about Arriflex is a very noisy camera? What do you think aboout it? Does it louder than Bolex?
I have a Beaulieu R16, when I tested in my school with Bolex, they all run in 24fps, but R16's sound is louder than Bolex.


It is an MOS camera...mostly all of them are noisy. If you intend to use the camera for sync sound films, I would not recommend it, but it suits my needs as I intend to use it for silent shorts.
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#11 Tim Carroll

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 09:09 AM

I heard about Arriflex is a very noisy camera? What do you think aboout it? Does it louder than Bolex?
I have a Beaulieu R16, when I tested in my school with Bolex, they all run in 24fps, but R16's sound is louder than Bolex.


The Arriflex 16S has many advantages over the Bolex. Quiet operation is really not one of them. A freshly cleaned, lubed, and adjusted Arriflex 16S will be slightly quieter than a Bolex. But we are still talking very noisy cameras.

If you want to do sync sound work, you should look at an Arriflex 16BL, or Eclair NPR or ACL, or a Cinema Products CP-16R. A jump up in price would include the Aaton LTR7 or an Arriflex 16SR. Those cameras can be used for sync sound filmmaking.

-Tim
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#12 Hau-Jou Chiou

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:13 AM

Thank you for all your answer!
But did you know which kind of lens(C-mount) use for Super16 BOLEX?
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#13 Zachary Vex

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 04:39 PM

i've got a Kodak K100 modified for super 16mm and it has a c-mount, and the lenses the previous owner selected were Computar TV lenses, 12.5mm and 25mm. these are probably not the most spectacular lenses in the world, but they cover the super 16mm frame.
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