Jump to content


Photo

What pulldown is used for 18 fps to video?


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Eric Fandrich

Eric Fandrich

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Other

Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:44 AM

I have seen a lot of discussion related to how to get from 24 fps film to video and back (interlaced or progressive) and various pulldown schemes. What I have not seen very much of is what people do for Regular-8 or Super-8 film shot at 18 fps.

How do I get from S-8 shot at 18 fps to 720 24p or 30p for example?

Can anybody give me the lowdown?
Is there a resource covering this information that you can recommend?

Thanks!
  • 0

#2 Bryan Darling

Bryan Darling
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 227 posts
  • Director
  • Sacramento, CA

Posted 30 September 2006 - 03:38 PM

My question would be for what purpose do you want to know? Just general curiosity or do you have some specific issue or purpose? I use a program to convert Super 8 film to 18fps playing speed within the context of NTSC 29.97fps.

The pulldown scheme is 4:3:3 for interlacing, meaning frames of film overlap fields of video. (A) frames to (4) fields of video, (B) frames to (3) fields of video, and © frames to (3) fields of video.

If I want progressive, meaning no frames of film overlapping fields of video, it is 4:4:2. (A) frames to (4) fields of video, (B) frames to (4) fields of video, © frames to 2 fields of video.

It would be different all together if I wanted to set it up for 23.976 fps editing. It would be 2:3:3 for interlaced and 2:4:4 for progressive.
  • 0


Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

The Slider

Tai Audio

CineTape

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Opal

The Slider

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS