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Decent Cinematography Books


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#1 Matthew Buick

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 06:18 AM

Can anyone recommend a good book on cinematography for a total n00b like me to learn from, I want to know as much as possible.

Thank you
-Matthew Buick
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#2 Hal Smith

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 06:45 AM

Can anyone recommend a good book on cinematography for a total n00b like me to
................

"Cinematography" 3d Edition is one of the best all around books, it covers the basics of everything.

http://www.theasc.co...catalogno=11239

You'll recognize one of the author's names.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 06:52 AM

Cool, David Mullen. :lol:

Edited by Matthew Buick, 01 October 2006 - 06:52 AM.

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#4 Tim Tyler

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 10:58 AM

http://cinematograph.../shop/books.asp
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:05 PM

http://cinematograph.../shop/books.asp

Tim,

Thanks for the reminder that the Forum hosts book links.

Hal
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#6 Matt Workman

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Posted 01 October 2006 - 11:45 PM

The big list of books is a little intimidating.

I liked:

- New Cinematographers (for the pretty photos and recent DPs)
- Contemporary Cinematographers: On their art (fun read)

Related:

- Set Lighting Techicians Handbook (Good reference for self-Gaffing)
- Camera Assistant : A Complete Professional Handbook (Good reference for self-AC)

Also:

- Breaking In : How 20 Film Directors Got their Start & The Mind of the Modern Movie Maker. These two are about directors but several of them started as DP's.

- Strike the Baby and Kill the Blonde (You will know every term in this from a week on set but its fun anyway)

These are my favorites so far, I'm still reading more.

Matt
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#7 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:52 AM

I have cinematography 2d edition (in worse for the wear condition, after 10 years of reading it) and want to know if its worth buying the 3d edition. The 2d edition is slightly outdated, it has no info of newer cameras, film stocks or post solutions (though the chapter on film editing is quite insightful, for someone like me of the digital era.)

Also it obviously doesn't have Mullen's name attached to it. Does david have any good points in there that makes buying the 3d edition worth it, or any updated info that makes it valuable? It was my first book on cinematography, and to this day is one of my go to book for technical info. I am sure I have absorbed all the info that book has to offer, but would gladly rebuy it if the 3d edition has enough new material for me to pour over.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 11:49 PM

Also it obviously doesn't have Mullen's name attached to it. Does david have any good points in there that makes buying the 3d edition worth it, or any updated info that makes it valuable? It was my first book on cinematography, and to this day is one of my go to book for technical info. I am sure I have absorbed all the info that book has to offer, but would gladly rebuy it if the 3d edition has enough new material for me to pour over.


It's about 25% new stuff -- the camera list was updated, but that was no big deal. Mainly I added a chapter on post-production lab processes, image manipulation, and D.I. (in general terms), talked about NLE editing and digital sound recording, and updated the lighting chapter to be more current. A few of the basic facts about stocks, lenses, etc. were smoothed over a little by me.
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#9 Greg Gross

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 12:52 PM

Suggest this book for use along with all the standard texts,manuals suggested here.

"Francois Truffaut at Work", by Carole Le Berre(Phaidon) 2005

La Nuit americaine (1973)
Day for Night

L' Homme qui aimait les femmes (1977)
The Man Who Loved Women
Check out interior lighting of car,camera angles,framing(The Man Who Loved Women)

Greg Gross
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#10 Michael Campanella

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 11:04 AM

I really liked "Cinematography - Theory and Practice: Image Making For Cinematographers, Directors, and Videographers" by Blain Brown. I would definitely recommend it as a starting point.
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#11 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 02:21 PM

Thank you everyone for helping out a rubbish n00b like me. :D
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#12 Morgan Peline

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 07:17 PM

Hi,

Books I have found really helpful:

Lighting for Film and Digital Cinematography (with InfoTrac) by Dave Viera and Maria Viera

Reflections: Twenty-One Cinematographers At Work by Benjamin Bergery

Film Lighting by Kris Malkiewicz

Technique of Lighting for Television and Film (The Library of Communication Techniques) by Gerald Millerson

In the order above is quite good as well as it goes from simple but straightfoward at the first book to very in-depth by the fourth.

Lighting for Location Motion Pictures by Alan J. Ritsko

is also quite good but a little old and out of print I think.
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#13 Hal Smith

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 07:39 PM

I like Doug Hart's "Assistant Cameraman" a lot, as a NooB Cinematographer you'll be doing for yourself all the things that an AC on a full crew does. Doug's book will be real helpful to you, he's a very clear writer and I think you'll like the book. I found my copy on bookfinder.com for $26! :)
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#14 Matthew Buick

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 08:30 PM

Thanks very much, I think I'll look into that.

P.S Tis spelt n-0-0-b, with two zeros.

Edited by Matthew Buick, 14 October 2006 - 08:31 PM.

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#15 Aaron Farrugia

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 09:08 PM

cinematography by blain brown

DEFINATLY reflections (one of the best reads ive had on the subject) great to see all the different views and approaches

the camera assistant handbook was awsome too

and once you get to know alot of the terms then grab yourself a copy of American cinematographer every month
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#16 Kevin Masuda

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 02:45 PM

Painting With Light by John Alton.

Kev
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#17 David Bradley

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 06:52 PM

Painting with Light by Alton: Haha funny thats the first book on cinematography I ever read and it definately teaches us alot about blocking for actors but the book is all about pre-technicolour lighting (if i remember rightly) Dont get me wrong its an amazing book but since most of us student cinematographers are shooting DV I would suggest Digital Cinematography by Paul Wheeler.

Alton is definately a worthy read though and I remember the lighting diagrams were fantastic although sometimes a little politically incorrect i.e. the chapter on 'lighting coloured people' in which Alton uses the stereotypical 'Mammy' as an example. Different time I suppose.

I have read

Blain Brown: Cinematography theory and practice
Micheal Rabiger: Directing Techniques and esthetics
ASC: selected tables and charts
Paul Wheeler: Digital cinematography
Screencraft: Cinematography

but im only a student so i cant comment on the value of these books nor would I dare to, I have found them all usefull as a starting point on a long road.

Kind regards

David
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#18 Matthew Buick

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 06:57 PM

Wow, talk about...











...BLAST FROM THE PAST!!!

Edited by Matthew Buick, 22 January 2007 - 06:59 PM.

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#19 David Sweetman

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 07:07 PM

...BLAST FROM THE PAST!!!

Yes, my gosh, from 3 months ago. Did they even have electricity back then?
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#20 Matthew Buick

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 03:28 PM

Yes, my gosh, from 3 months ago. Did they even have electricity back then?


Oh, electricty...pff...new fangled poop, coal an' gas for me. :D
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Metropolis Post

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Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS