Jump to content


Photo

The Shining


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Jason Debus

Jason Debus
  • Sustaining Members
  • 311 posts
  • Student
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 01 October 2006 - 05:02 PM

The Shining played last night at a midnight screening at the Rialto theater in Pasadena. The first and last reels weren't in the best shape but the rest of the film looked great.

There was a lot of blown out backlight used in the film that I didn't notice so much watching it on DVD over the years. Also it was quite refreshing seeing something without the 'crushed blacks' look that is prevelent today. It seemed like the film may have been flashed, does anyone know if the VariCon was used?
  • 0

#2 Frank Barrera

Frank Barrera
  • Sustaining Members
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 01 October 2006 - 06:58 PM

I saw it at a midnight screening at the Amherst Theatre in Buffalo NY several months ago. It was incredible to see one of my favorite films actually projected. Nice to see it in 1:85. All those sweeping landscape establishing driving shots at the begining were so fresh as if I was seeing them for the first time. It was the first midnight screening of any movie that I've seen where (packed house) everyone was silent as you could imagine for the entire film.

I actually have a copy of American Cinematographer's Magazine from August 1980 with the front page story about The Shining. There is no mention of flashing the film.

F
  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:26 PM

No, there was no flashing and hardly any filtering -- it was shot on 5247 (100 ASA) stock processed normally, not pushed like "Barry Lyndon", "Full Metal Jacket", "Eyes Wide Shut" were because they wanted a pristine look. Mostly what you are seeing in terms of milkiness is lens flare from the bright windows and practicals, especially with any shots made using a zoom. Or you are seeing some aging of the negative causing the blacks to be lifted, or the projection at the Rialto has trouble getting decent blacks (a common problem at some art house cinemas.) A few shots may have used a Low Con filter to reduce contrast, also causing some increased flare and milkiness.
  • 0

#4 Greg Lowry

Greg Lowry
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 52 posts
  • Other
  • Vancouver

Posted 01 October 2006 - 07:37 PM

No, there was no flashing and hardly any filtering -- it was shot on 5247 (100 ASA) stock processed normally, not pushed like "Barry Lyndon", "Full Metal Jacket", "Eyes Wide Shut" were because they wanted a pristine look. Mostly what you are seeing in terms of milkiness is lens flare from the bright windows and practicals, especially with any shots made using a zoom. Or you are seeing some aging of the negative causing the blacks to be lifted, or the projection at the Rialto has trouble getting decent blacks (a common problem at some art house cinemas.) A few shots may have used a Low Con filter to reduce contrast, also causing some increased flare and milkiness.


The same milkiness/flare is evident in a few scenes in FMJ, especially in the first barracks scene with the bright windows blowing out and serving as backlight. This is one of Kubrick's visual trademarks.
  • 0


CineLab

Opal

Willys Widgets

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Abel Cine

CineTape

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Wooden Camera