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A cordless drill?


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#1 Brant Collins

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:15 AM

I was watching the making of Running Scared with Paul Walker and there is a scene int he making off footage where a cordless drill was attached to the side of a camera and while they were filming they where pulsing th edril. What was that for?
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#2 Drew Hoffman

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:19 AM

I haven't seen the making of piece you're talking about, but I'm assuming it's a zoom control.

Edited by Drew Hoffman, 02 October 2006 - 12:20 AM.

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#3 Brant Collins

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 12:23 AM

I do not think so. it is a hand held 35mm camera and it is laying on the ground maybe 5 feet from the actors and they are pulsing the drill. I thing it was for some sort of flicker or something.
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#4 david west

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:31 AM

were they using the drill in place of the camera motor? ....sort of a 28days later pulse flicker chaser scene effect?
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#5 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 01:41 AM

How ironic. I just watched that this weekend and was going to ask the same question. I watched the featurette and the sequence over and over, and yes they were replacing the camera motor with a cordless drill.

If you watch they intercut several shots together in jumpcut fasion, and let the flash created from the motor speeding up and slowing down stay in some times. It looks like it was used to make a random time-ramp effect. I cannot understand, however how they accomplished keeping the image exposed correctly? Was it done by feel, or just done enough until they had a good take that stays in exposure for long enough. They operator was putting very quick bursts of full throttle, so maybe the top end was what they exposed to, and the ramp up and down was meant to overexpose. Who knows, very interesting though.

What a coincidence we both noticed the same thing on the same weekend.
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#6 Brant Collins

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 09:00 AM

I guess we are both just obsernvant :) I really liked the movie, had some nice touches.
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#7 Sam Wells

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:58 AM

What camera was it ?

-Sam
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#8 Michael Collier

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 06:02 PM

It looked like a panavision millenium or something similar, but I am new to the film game, so I don't have the best eye yet. The drill was mounted towards the rear of the camera, with what looked like a homemade bracket made of plate aluminum.
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