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Salvaging underexposed reversal -


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#1 grantsmith

grantsmith
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Posted 02 October 2006 - 05:03 PM

Hi there,

Just got some footage back from a shoot I did. There seems to have been a problem with my camera (Nizo).

I was shooting on Kodachrome K40. There did not seem to be a problem with my light meter (I was using auto to get a rough idea then compensating by eye) and was getting what I would think would be a 'normal' reading (i.e. plenty of light and not t2.8 etc).

Anyway, I got my film back and it looks at least two stops under exposed. (I also had one roll on full auto which came back the same)

Not sure what is wrong with the camera (some iris problem I imagine) though my main problem of concern is is there any way I can fix the problem.

I initially projected the footage which looks very murky with virtually no detail in the shadowy areas and more importantly, very dark face.

I tried putting the projecter very close to the screen which did improve it some what but not enough to really get a decent image.

I know there is little scope with reversal for correction. I'm not expecting to get anything resembling a decent image but can telecine do something to help? Even if it is very grainy, it is better than no image.

A sad end to my last kodachrome shoot.


Any help is much appreciated.

Thanks
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#2 Frank Barrera

Frank Barrera
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Posted 03 October 2006 - 08:40 AM

with reversal, as you are aware, there is no room for error. that means if you lose info on the exposure there is simply no way of retrieving it in post. a couple of years ago i shot a short B & W 16mm reversal film that we pushed processed two stops which gave me even less room for error. of course there is a shot in there that is just so unbelievably under it still hurts me to this day when I think about it. not only did i set the iris for the blazing sun that was low in the horizen but i also forgot that i had some ND on the lens. actually the shot is still used in the final cut. it's weird because it's supposed to be a day time shot and looks like a set of car headlights down the street with zero fill. looks like crap but the director went with it.

f
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rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

Wooden Camera