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Annie Hall


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#1 Gerry Mendoza

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 06:30 PM

I was wondering if anyone can tell me what film stock Gordon Willis used for Annie Hall
Thanks In Regards,
Gerry
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#2 Daniel Carruthers

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 09:06 PM

I was wondering if anyone can tell me what film stock Gordon Willis used for Annie Hall
Thanks In Regards,
Gerry



I was wondering if anyone can tell me what film stock Gordon Willis used for Annie Hall
Thanks In Regards,
Gerry

oops posted your message back at you!

I just finished watching anniehall on t.v. I dont have a clue what stock he used. hmmmm maybe it was my telivision but it seemed to have very low contrast. crushed blacks. i dont know? I wish i knew sorry to waste your time, i was thinking about that movie before i logged on hear so thats why i replied!
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 11:58 PM

The movie was made during a transition period when Kodak was switching over from 5254 to 5247, both 100 ASA tungsten-balanced stocks. The Series 600 version of 5247 came out in August 1976 and obsoleted 5254 finally after a two-year overlap. "Annie Hall" was released in the spring of 1977 but was probably shot a year before that so I suspect it was shot on 5254, not 5247.
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:04 PM

The movie was made during a transition period when Kodak was switching over from 5254 to 5247, both 100 ASA tungsten-balanced stocks. The Series 600 version of 5247 came out in August 1976 and obsoleted 5254 finally after a two-year overlap. "Annie Hall" was released in the spring of 1977 but was probably shot a year before that so I suspect it was shot on 5254, not 5247.


Since Willis has refered to looking at 5247 as looking at linoleum because of its lack of texture (grain),
5254 seems correct.
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#5 Gerry Mendoza

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Posted 05 October 2006 - 08:35 PM

The movie was made during a transition period when Kodak was switching over from 5254 to 5247, both 100 ASA tungsten-balanced stocks. The Series 600 version of 5247 came out in August 1976 and obsoleted 5254 finally after a two-year overlap. "Annie Hall" was released in the spring of 1977 but was probably shot a year before that so I suspect it was shot on 5254, not 5247.


Dear Mr David Mullen ASC,
I've read some of your replies in the past and I've always been amazed by your answers. I think I read about you once on Fuji's Exposure or Kodak's InCamera. My alternative readings to AC. Anyways thank you so much.
Since I'm at the topic of film stock I was wondering if you knew what Mr Dean Semler used for the "The Longest Yard". I contacted his old agent she was kind enough to forward my question. But she informed me that Mr Semler was no longer with them.
Warmest Regards,
Gerry Mendoza
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 October 2006 - 01:59 AM

I don't know what Semler used on that one, but until lately when he discovered the Panavision Genesis digital camera, he was fond of using 500T stock for entire movies (he even did some features entirely on the Kodak 800T stock when it was available.) So my guess would be 5218 Kodak Vision-2 500T for that film.
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#7 Mike Rufail

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Posted 07 October 2006 - 01:47 AM

Speaking of 800T, were you a fan David? Some of the recan distributors still have some available. I have used this stock before and wasn't extremely impressed, but I thought it would be a mainstay stock for certain applications. 5229 seems to be taking over. I'm sure this has been discussed before, but I was curious what you think about the 800T stock and what the future holds for the development of a stock similar to it.
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 October 2006 - 10:05 AM

800T had limited uses for myself - it was saturated but grainy, so if you wanted that look... Remember that probably the best-looking 800T shows were shot in 35mm anamorphic (Donnie Darko, We Were Soldiers) so had the advantage of a larger negative.

Modern 500T stocks pushed one-stop are less grainy than 800T was normal, so there is less reason for the old 800T stock until someone bites the bullet and puts out a new 1000T stock. I think Kodak & Fuji should make a 1000T stock if only to reduce the trend of using HD for low-light situations, like "Mission Impossible 2" and "Silent Hill" did for certain shots.
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#9 Mike Rufail

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Posted 07 October 2006 - 04:12 PM

I think Kodak & Fuji should make a 1000T stock if only to reduce the trend of using HD for low-light situations, like "Mission Impossible 2" and "Silent Hill" did for certain shots.


It would be refreshing to see some advancement in a stock like that. A small smack to the face of those trend setters you speak of, but I guess business is business and the market would have to be in harmony with Kodak or Fuji's goals. I have not been versed in the current developments of either company. However, I would like to know more about their future plans for new stocks. I am particularly interested if they are planning to offer any specialty stocks such as the infrared one used for the indie "Wristcutters" http://www.wristcutters.com/. I would love to purchase some of that stock if any knows where I could find some.
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#10 Gerry Mendoza

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 10:53 PM

I don't know what Semler used on that one, but until lately when he discovered the Panavision Genesis digital camera, he was fond of using 500T stock for entire movies (he even did some features entirely on the Kodak 800T stock when it was available.) So my guess would be 5218 Kodak Vision-2 500T for that film.


Thanks I'll add that to my list
Gerry
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#11 kelly tippett

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 01:21 AM

was annie hall 16mm or 35mm?
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#12 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 01:53 AM

35mm.
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#13 Oron Cohen

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 04:01 AM

Hi,

I didn't want to create a knew thread so I just posted here. I want to know your opinions about which film stock should I use (with combination of filters maybe) to get a similar look to "annie hall", most of the film is in day time, half exteriors and half interiors.
we are shooting on super16 and intend to do a blow-up to 35mm(probably a direct blow-up).
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#14 John Sprung

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 11:49 AM

The movie was made during a transition period when Kodak was switching over from 5254 to 5247, both 100 ASA tungsten-balanced stocks. The Series 600 version of 5247 came out in August 1976 and obsoleted 5254 finally after a two-year overlap. "Annie Hall" was released in the spring of 1977 but was probably shot a year before that so I suspect it was shot on 5254, not 5247.

"Annie Hall" was shot in the fall of 1976. I know this because I was 1st AC on a feature that used the old Venice police station as a location, and there was some concern that we get out of there before they needed it. Our show started the first week of September, and I'm sure it was 1976 because after we wrapped, I caught up on the news and learned that Chairman Mao had died -- which I just looked up again, it was 9-9-76. (We were on 5247-600 BTW)



-- J.S.
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#15 Oron Cohen

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 06:11 PM

Anyone? Please, it is very important to me.
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#16 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 08:45 PM

" didn't want to create a knew thread so I just posted here. I want to know your opinions about which film stock should I use (with combination of filters maybe) to get a similar look to "annie hall", most of the film is in day time, half exteriors and half interiors.
we are shooting on super16 and intend to do a blow-up to 35mm(probably a direct blow-up)."

Well, that's a big question. If you can identify something that is particular to the look of Annie Hall, that would give us a start.
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#17 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 08:49 PM

There's nothing distinctive about the look of the film stock in "Annie Hall". It's all about lighting, composition, staging, etc. in terms of the look of "Annie Hall." Since it was shot in 35mm, 100 ASA stock, I would use a 200-250ASA stock for interiors if possible if you are shooting in Super-16.
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