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12x400f rolls, 4 hours of telecine


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#1 Jan Kielland

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 09:10 AM

I'm going to telecine on friday with 12x400feet rolls. We only have 4 hours at the telecine and there is no way we can afford more time there.

Any suggestions to speed up the process as much as possible without compromising the look of our film too much?


Jan Kielland
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:30 PM

Is that including tape down time?

A trick is to FF through scenes you know you're never going to use. You can also tape as you go, but that normally ends up saving little time in the end and is a bit of a pain. Also, put the lab reel up first where you know you have mid's and CU's to grade on - it's pointless sticking the reel on with mostly wides, because then you end up wasting time having to spool past material you can't set the look on.

Otherwise, 12 rolls in 4 hours is not too bad. Just keep it brisk and it won't be a problem (and get a colorist who knows his way around the machine).
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#3 Dan Goulder

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 12:54 PM

I'm going to telecine on friday with 12x400feet rolls. We only have 4 hours at the telecine and there is no way we can afford more time there.

Any suggestions to speed up the process as much as possible without compromising the look of our film too much?
Jan Kielland

You didn't specify if it was 16mm or 35mm. If it's 35mm, that should be enough time for best light transfer. If it's 16mm, you may get by with a one light transfer, but you still might run a little over timewise.
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#4 Bryan Darling

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Posted 04 October 2006 - 01:06 PM

With the lab I have used over the years you are billed not just for the time it takes to go through and set out the corrections but also the time it takes to then run the film back through and onto tape. You'll want to keep that in mind. The other thing is to let your colorist know that you can only afford 4 hours. They are usually pretty accommodating about those things and may let you slide a few minutes to 1/2 hour. If anything it also gives them a reference and can keep things moving, in addition a good colorist will let you know that you may be spending too much time tweaking certain things.
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Opal

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

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rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks