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Need help with a Luna Star F2


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#1 Derick Thomas

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Posted 08 October 2006 - 06:06 PM

Hey Guys,
I have a Gossen Luna STar F2, light meter. I don't really understand the thing. I just need basic instructions for getting a proper reading. I know how to setting the ISO, but what setting should it be on to get the proper reading. t, f or EV? Thanks.

Here's another amateur question and I have loads of them. After I set the camera to the the light meter setting, does it matter how far I am away from the subject? I am talking between 5 and 20 feet? Does the light tell me how far away I should be? As you can see I need your help. Hope to hear from some knowledgeable fella soon. Thanks
film guys B)
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#2 Mike Rizos

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 07:44 PM

That meter is also known as Variosix F2. I think Luna Star is the N. American marketed name.
You need to start by reading the manual. If you don't have it, get it here from Gossen:

http://www.gossen-ph...anleitungen.gif


Basically, the meter provides two types of light measurement: Reflected and incident. Reflected means you are reading how much light is reflected off the subject, and is normaly taken from the camera position. Incident means how much light is falling on the subject, and is taken at the subject position. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. Angle of coverage for reflected is 30 degrees, for incident 180.

Edited by Mike Rizos, 09 October 2006 - 07:45 PM.

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#3 Derick Thomas

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 09:58 PM

Thanks, I have the manual, don't like it. It tells you how to operate it but DPs know how to use it, if that makes any sense. I'm trying find out what is the easiest way to use this thing. For instance, I'll more than likely use the incident to start but I'm having a hard time figuring which setting is the most accurate t, f or ev. Which one is commonly used by a dp. Thanks
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#4 Mike Rizos

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 08:42 PM

They're all equally accurate, but DPs use f.
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