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Flying Spot or Bonolabs for the Hard Drive transfer?


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#1 Chris Graham

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 01:17 AM

Flying Spot:

TRANSFER TO DRIVES
We now offer direct to drive film transfers. The rate is $250 per hour of
capture / file management, in addition to the telecine charge.
We do offer a standby rate of $125/hr. We require that you provide a MAC OS formatted drive.
Download this calculator from AJA, to help you understand how much drive space
you will need based upon the type of files you want and the running time of your footage.
Here is an example: One hour of uncompressed 1920x1080 29.97 HD
would require 596.6 GB - at 23.98 it would require 477.28 GB

vs.

Bonolabs:

The confirmation test drive is a required step for all new drive clients. It gives you the opportunity to ensure compatibility and functionality of your system and the workflow. (We are not testing your abilities, so please do not get offended by this requirement.) We'll send you your choice of one of our USB 2.0 Firewire 400 or USB 2.0 mini drives loaded with several test clips in either 1080/24p (23.98sf) QuickTime (Blackmagic codec) 10-bit uncompressed, DVCPro HD or HDV for MAC users or 1080/24p (23.98sF) AVI (Blackmagic codec) or HDV for PC users to try out on your system. The clips are of footage in the public domain and are designed to test functionality and for you to work with the display options (including the inverse anamorphic) and compare the best-light and flat transfers. There is an option to test NTSC, if you prefer. Here's how it works:

$15 for each clip that you order (see the PDF order form for all your options.)

you are responsible for the drive deposit (pre-authorization on your credit card for value of drive)

you pay for shipping, $10 handling fee, and insurance both ways

you have 3 days to download the files from the time you receive the hard drive; please keep in mind the drive is a transportation device, not a rental unit. Communication with us is key. If you need more time e-mail us with your request and circumstances. Please be aware that if we don't hear from you a late charge of $25 per day will start accruing on day 4. You are required to e-mail us with the tracking information on the return shipment date.


I have four rolls that I want to send in and get over with. Will post clips for you guys too. I'm attempting for everyone's sake so that we can see results, but want your opinions. One hour of uncompressed 1920x1080 29.97 HD from Flying Spot is the overall tempter. What do you guys think. Is the Flying Spot 10-bit as well?
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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 09:58 AM

Flying Spot vs. Bonolabs


You'll get MUCH better color out of Flying Spot with their colorists. Bonolabs has a different philosophy, they due as neutral of a transfer as possible so YOU can adjust it. Both houses do a great job in their own way, you just need to consider what you're looking for.

Flying Spot in Seattle gave me one of the most amazing Super 8 transfers I ever had, I put it right up against some 16mm from the same day and same lighting and it was hard to tell the difference. They use some sort of noise reduction I think because with 200T, I saw almost no grain.

I've used Bonolabs as well and the resolution is great to work with, I'm just not that great of a colorist so I like to have a pro adjust for me (plus a DaVinci color corrector is much more powerful than what I have in Final Cut.)

What's wild is cutting the HD footage into SD projects. You can pan and zoom without any loss of quality; fixing poor framing easily and doing some pretty cool effects.
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#3 steve hyde

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 09:38 PM

...I've got a project at FSFT now on stand by for xfer. I have decided to use a DigiBeta/Dvcam simul record workflow for several reasons. The footage is 4:3 16mm and Super8 so using DVC HD doesn't really justify the added expense. Yes, I could ask for 10bit 4:2:2 direct to hard drive at an added expense, but the Digibeta will give me 8bit 4:2:2 so I can always conform to that in an online if I want to. I have decided to go with the middle ground.

Personally, I think the skills and talent of the colorist are more important than tape formats.

I have never used Bonolabs.

Steve
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#4 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 09 October 2006 - 10:31 PM

Flying Spot in Seattle gave me one of the most amazing Super 8 transfers I ever had, I put it right up against some 16mm from the same day and same lighting and it was hard to tell the difference. They use some sort of noise reduction I think because with 200T, I saw almost no grain.

I've always had the same experience with them. I've had a lot of S8 500T done there, and that even looked close to 16mm. One time I did a mix of 500T S8 and 16mm, the difference was usually obvious but there we're a couple shots that I couldn't tell apart.
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