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#1 Ashim

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 02:52 AM

Hello,

I'd like to know what is a Motion control rig and for what purpose is it use? Are'nt Milo and Nero
motion control rigs, heard Nero was used in the lord of the rings. Does anyone know for which shots were they
exactly use?

Also I'd like to know how are shots like spiderman swinging around from one bulding to another executed?
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 03:19 AM

Hello,

I'd like to know what is a Motion control rig and for what purpose is it use? Are'nt Milo and Nero
motion control rigs, heard Nero was used in the lord of the rings. Does anyone know for which shots were they
exactly use?

Also I'd like to know how are shots like spiderman swinging around from one bulding to another executed?


Hi,

Motion control is used for a variety of reasons:-

Repeat Moves - Making elements appear and disappear, crowd replication, changing backgrounds and foregrounds, filming action at different speeds, putting elements together.

Scaled Moves - Shooting miniatures, rotating camera moves, matching scales.

Controlled Moves - For controlled filming and lighting on products.

CGI Export - Combining live-action to CGI.

CGI Import - Complex moves, unusual shapes, impossible moves, Pre-visualisation.

Frozen Moment Integration - For mixing live-action and time-slicing or "bullet-time".

Stephen
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#3 Ashim

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 03:31 AM

Stephen Thank You very much.

But could you direct me to some resources on the Net where I could get
a beginners perspective on Motion Control Cameras.

By the way thanks again fore referring to DigitalPraxis.net... It is highly
informative.

Ashim
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 03:43 AM

Stephen Thank You very much.

But could you direct me to some resources on the Net where I could get
a beginners perspective on Motion Control Cameras.

By the way thanks again fore referring to DigitalPraxis.net... It is highly
informative.

Ashim


Ashim,

www.mrmoco.com

They have a DVD they will send you about motion control.

disclaimer
I have been a user of Mark Roberts Motion Control equipment for 25 years. There is a testimonial from me on their website.

Stephen
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#5 Stuart McCammon

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 09:25 AM

Quick, someone tell Mark Roberts that his website name means "Mr. Booger" in Spanish)
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#6 Ashim

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 12:50 PM

Stephen:

What do you exactly mean by rotating camera moves, matching scales
complex moves, unusual shapes???,impossible moves...

Would you kindly elaborate on the above.
And why do we need a MoCo to shoot miniatures, Cant they be shot
using normal cameras.

Thanks.
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 01:07 PM

Stephen:

What do you exactly mean by rotating camera moves, matching scales
complex moves, unusual shapes???,impossible moves...

Would you kindly elaborate on the above.
And why do we need a MoCo to shoot miniatures, Cant they be shot
using normal cameras.

Thanks.



Hi Ashim,

By rotating the camera and repeating a move (against a greenscreen) actors can be walking on the floor and ceiling and walls.

Matching scales is when an actor is keyed into a a smaller model environment, the 2 moves have to match.

Complex is where the camera is choreographed to be very accurately positioned throughout a camera move, some shots in Spiderman spring to mind.

Moves created in a 3d system can be unusual and sometimes phicallly impossible, by making a move in several segments the camera can track through walls etc.

I often shoot close up moves on watches with a motion control. Its often impossible to light the shot in 1 pass! I usually shoot between 5 and 20 passes that get composited later. Depth of field is often 1 or 2 mm, I can place the focus where I want it!

Stephen
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#8 Gavin Greenwalt

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 02:10 PM

Besides the need to often shoot multiple passes on a miniature which Stephen mentioned there is also the practical challenges of filming even one pass by hand. A computer can almost perfeclty move an articulated motion control system. Trying to get a grip to do a 1/2" per second dolly smoothly is just honestly asking too much. Any mistake on a miniature is going to be amplified hundreds or thousands of times over so there's really no room for error.

- Gavin

Edited by Gavin Greenwalt, 11 October 2006 - 02:10 PM.

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#9 Nick Mulder

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 03:32 PM

Stephen:

What do you exactly mean by rotating camera moves, matching scales
complex moves, unusual shapes???,impossible moves...

Would you kindly elaborate on the above.
And why do we need a MoCo to shoot miniatures, Cant they be shot
using normal cameras.

Thanks.



Have a look at the showreel section at mrmoco.com - there are some The Making Of type movies you can download that show two supposedly unrelated scenes being filmed and the resulting composite..

The Mitsubishi one I remember well as you can cleary set happening - a real 'ahhh, thats how they do it' moment...

not quite related to miniatures that one, but it still helps
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#10 David Winters

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 11:17 PM

www.cameracontrol.com has lots of great examples and explanations too.
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#11 Stephen Williams

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 01:52 AM

www.cameracontrol.com has lots of great examples and explanations too.


Hi,

Camera Control is owned by Matt Roberts, Mark Roberts son. They also sell rigs in the USA.

Stephen
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