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Bell and Howell


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#1 dave penny

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 11:28 AM

I have recently aquired a bell and howell camera it is in beutiful condition and I am dying to use it. I am a total novice in using moving image but I am a photographer and some of my knowledge has been useful in working things out with this camera. The camera came the two cassettes one seems to be exposed and one is unexposed. My question is can I get the exposed film processed or process at home (i have access to all photo film processing equipment) and can I buy new loaded cassettes for the camera, or perhaps i'm suppost to take the cassette apart and reload it myself? I really don't know, and am having trouble finding much useful information on the net. Any help or advice would be greatly welcomed. OH i'm in the UK too if that helps (or not)
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#2 steve hyde

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 12:47 PM

...a good place to start is here:

http://homepage.mac.com/onsuper8/

Steve
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#3 Nate Downes

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 01:01 PM

I have recently aquired a bell and howell camera it is in beutiful condition and I am dying to use it. I am a total novice in using moving image but I am a photographer and some of my knowledge has been useful in working things out with this camera. The camera came the two cassettes one seems to be exposed and one is unexposed. My question is can I get the exposed film processed or process at home (i have access to all photo film processing equipment) and can I buy new loaded cassettes for the camera, or perhaps i'm suppost to take the cassette apart and reload it myself? I really don't know, and am having trouble finding much useful information on the net. Any help or advice would be greatly welcomed. OH i'm in the UK too if that helps (or not)


Alan Gordon Enterprices sometimes has the cartridge. Those are 50' loads, not easy to home process but not too bad. The main concern is age, those guys are sometimes well over 50 years old, and parts do wear out.

I own one of these old cartridge based 16mm cameras, and they are fun to work with. Hand-loading the cart is fairly easy to do, but takes practice.
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#4 Will Montgomery

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Posted 11 October 2006 - 07:55 PM

That might be a double 8 magazine camera. The cartridge is more of a rectangle than the square Super 8 cartridge.

If so, it would be a 25ft roll of 16mm film that's perfed in the middle to give you 50ft of regular 8mm film. Those were cool cameras because of how small they were for the time.
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#5 Nate Downes

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Posted 12 October 2006 - 07:45 AM

As we have 3 guesses here as to which camera this is (Magazine 16, Magazine 8 and a Super8) how about the model # of the camera itself, so we can point you to the right direction?
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