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Old Nightmares, a short super8 film shoot on 100D.


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#1 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 12 October 2006 - 10:08 AM

Hello All!

Backround:

My teacher asigned us to do a short 3-4 min chase video that all the editing has to be done in the camera. After class I asked if I can do it on super8 since I had one roll of color reversal 100D and the requirements seemed to fit in with what one roll can do. He agreed. He did say I could add sounds, music, and titles in the begining and end if we wished just as long as it wasn't superimposed over the footage we shoot. This is my second roll of super8 I have ever shoot. My camera was limited on what it can do. It was a Bell & Howell 2123 XL

I transfered it myself using a projector and my DVX100B. I know that's a terrible way to do a tranfer but this project to me was more for fun then anything else.

Hope you like it. :)

Old Nightmares
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#2 Andrew Means

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 02:49 AM

Hello All!

Backround:

My teacher asigned us to do a short 3-4 min chase video that all the editing has to be done in the camera. After class I asked if I can do it on super8 since I had one roll of color reversal 100D and the requirements seemed to fit in with what one roll can do. He agreed. He did say I could add sounds, music, and titles in the begining and end if we wished just as long as it wasn't superimposed over the footage we shoot. This is my second roll of super8 I have ever shoot. My camera was limited on what it can do. It was a Bell & Howell 2123 XL

I transfered it myself using a projector and my DVX100B. I know that's a terrible way to do a tranfer but this project to me was more for fun then anything else.

Hope you like it. :)

Old Nightmares


Looks great- super fuzzy, but I bet it looked way cooler than everybody else's digital projects. The one slow shot of the sky (kind of drops the energy in the middle of the chase, but eh) looked really cool. Keep shooting!
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#3 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 10:33 AM

Thanks Andrew! I agree now that the shot of the sky does slow things down a little bit. When I showed it to the class I got so many questions on it. Some even wanted to know what effects I used to make it look like film :P
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#4 Sean McHenry

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 11:51 AM

Something to consider when doing transfers "on the cheap"...

If you will be capturing with any modern video editing NLE, try what I tried recently, rear screen projection.

Simple method is like this;
shoot the projected image on a piece (sample - hint, hint) of rear screen projection material from a projector screen company, like Drapper or other screen company. You can now put your nice 3-chip DV, or in my case, a Sony PDX-10 camera directly square on to the reversed image using a tripod, etc. You will have no keystoning in your image this way.

You could also try scrim materials as a screen. Get some heavy opal, it's a cheap screen, staple a section of it to a small wooden frame to hold it steady.

Use the NLE software to flip it horizontally, otherwise the image is backwards.

Something to watch out for, if you make the image smaller, it will be much brighter - however - if your screen material is a textured material or worse, glass beaded, you will see the beads as "grain" in your video image that doesn't move or change.

I am thinking of a smaller circular spinning screen to keep the "grain" of the screen from showing up. Sort of the opposite end of the spectrum but the same idea as a 35mm adapter for video. They use a spinning glass disc to focus interchangable lenses on and the camera picks up this image (usually flipped also) to tape.

Just better cheap alternatives.

Sean McHenry

Edited by Sean McHenry, 13 October 2006 - 11:52 AM.

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#5 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 01:44 PM

Something to consider when doing transfers "on the cheap"...

If you will be capturing with any modern video editing NLE, try what I tried recently, rear screen projection.

Simple method is like this;
shoot the projected image on a piece (sample - hint, hint) of rear screen projection material from a projector screen company, like Drapper or other screen company. You can now put your nice 3-chip DV, or in my case, a Sony PDX-10 camera directly square on to the reversed image using a tripod, etc. You will have no keystoning in your image this way.

You could also try scrim materials as a screen. Get some heavy opal, it's a cheap screen, staple a section of it to a small wooden frame to hold it steady.

Use the NLE software to flip it horizontally, otherwise the image is backwards.

Something to watch out for, if you make the image smaller, it will be much brighter - however - if your screen material is a textured material or worse, glass beaded, you will see the beads as "grain" in your video image that doesn't move or change.

I am thinking of a smaller circular spinning screen to keep the "grain" of the screen from showing up. Sort of the opposite end of the spectrum but the same idea as a 35mm adapter for video. They use a spinning glass disc to focus interchangable lenses on and the camera picks up this image (usually flipped also) to tape.

Just better cheap alternatives.

Sean McHenry


I am deffenitly going to look into that. Thanks for the tip!

Justin
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#6 Matthew Buick

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 05:06 PM

Not bad, cinematography was a little rough, and the victim was definately grinning when the killer confronted her, but I liked it.

GOOD JOB. ;)
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Willys Widgets

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The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

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Paralinx LLC

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Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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