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3 Axis head on a steadicam


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#1 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 12:28 AM

Anyone know if it's possible to fly a 3 axis head from chapman on a steadicam, and possibly get low shots with it?

the rig will carry a F900R and possibly a pro35with a 6-24mm.

Any other suggestions besides the chapman head? I've looked at doggicam systems as well, but I am not familiar with this setup, and would love advice.

Thank you,
Jamie Metzger
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 01:42 AM

Why put any tripod head on a Steadicam -- you're not going to operate the head separately from the Steadicam operator's movements, are you? Otherwise, you might as well put the head on a dolly.

And why not just put the Steadicam in low-mode?

It would be helpful if you explained what you were trying to do. Are you thinking more about needing a motion vibration isolator for a move on bumpy ground? Otherwise, what are you trying to do that a Steadicam person can't normally do with the camera in low-mode?
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#3 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 02:18 AM

Why put any tripod head on a Steadicam -- you're not going to operate the head separately from the Steadicam operator's movements, are you? Otherwise, you might as well put the head on a dolly.

And why not just put the Steadicam in low-mode?

It would be helpful if you explained what you were trying to do. Are you thinking more about needing a motion vibration isolator for a move on bumpy ground? Otherwise, what are you trying to do that a Steadicam person can't normally do with the camera in low-mode?


Hey Mr. Mullen,

I need a 3 axis head to make the camera spin on 3 axis' when I need it to. The camera will constantly be moving, much less than "irreversible", but there are occasions where the camera needs to flip 180, or rotate 90.

The steadicam op, has to make moves around the subjects, so there will be a person controlling the remotes for the rotation.

I would love it if the same 3 axis head could go onto a jib arm as well. What's the possibility of this?
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#4 Bruce Greene

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 02:27 AM

Anyone know if it's possible to fly a 3 axis head from chapman on a steadicam, and possibly get low shots with it?

the rig will carry a F900R and possibly a pro35with a 6-24mm.

Any other suggestions besides the chapman head? I've looked at doggicam systems as well, but I am not familiar with this setup, and would love advice.

Thank you,
Jamie Metzger

There are no 3 axis heads that will hold an f900r and still be small and light enough to go on a steadicam so you're out of luck here.

There is a Steadicam like device that has a 3rd axis electronic stabilzer called the "alien revolution". You can read about it here: http://www.alien-revolution.com

You might also want to check out this: http://www.robotswithcameras.com/ to learn about this robotic camera dolly with a 3 way stabilized head. It might be just what your looking for.

BTW, I think you're idea is a good one. You'll just have to develop a very-very light weight HD camera/lens and a mini 3 way motion stabilized head that can be handheld in some fashion. It will probably take two people to operate the thing (one to fly it and one to pan and tilt it) but you'll get some amazing shots after your million dollar (at least) investment.
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#5 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 12:15 PM

There are no 3 axis heads that will hold an f900r and still be small and light enough to go on a steadicam so you're out of luck here.

There is a Steadicam like device that has a 3rd axis electronic stabilzer called the "alien revolution". You can read about it here: http://www.alien-revolution.com

You might also want to check out this: http://www.robotswithcameras.com/ to learn about this robotic camera dolly with a 3 way stabilized head. It might be just what your looking for.

BTW, I think you're idea is a good one. You'll just have to develop a very-very light weight HD camera/lens and a mini 3 way motion stabilized head that can be handheld in some fashion. It will probably take two people to operate the thing (one to fly it and one to pan and tilt it) but you'll get some amazing shots after your million dollar (at least) investment.


Well those links helped quite a bit; im starting to think that this 3 axis head is going to have to go on a jib the whole time?
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#6 Rob van Gelder

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 01:07 PM

There is no possibility to mount a 3-axis remote head for this size camera on any steadicam, nor is there an operator who could handle such contraption!

However, there is the Alien Revolution, or AR, a motorized steadicam (head) that can do what you want, but not with the camera you mention.
A HD head with lens only, no recorder can be fitted, as some small film cameras as well.

Then there is Roll vision, though i did not hear much good from that, untill now.

The company MK-V in England makes the AR, look them up on the web
They have some cool videos to show
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#7 Bruce Greene

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 01:24 PM

Well those links helped quite a bit; im starting to think that this 3 axis head is going to have to go on a jib the whole time?


And it will have to be a very heavy duty jib as well. Even a 2 axis head can be quite heavy with an f-900. With the camera and head you'll probably have over 100 lbs at the end of the jib.
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#8 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 04:10 PM

And it will have to be a very heavy duty jib as well. Even a 2 axis head can be quite heavy with an f-900. With the camera and head you'll probably have over 100 lbs at the end of the jib.



thanks to both of you for the feedback, it's helping.

I know Ken Ferro personally, and he told me that he used a gyro/rotation device thing that he held on his steadicam. It was supposed to emulate a bullet, so I assume the rig spun as he walked.

Is there any camera that can deliver a 4:4:4 image that isn't as heavy? We considered the HVX200, but I think that's too "prosumer" for this production.
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#9 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 11:12 PM

You could use the T-block version (HKC-T950) of the F950 where the lens and optical / CCD block is separate from the camera body, but you'd have one cable from the T-block to the camera body and another from the camera to the HDCAM-SR recorder. "Crank" used this to shoot a lot of action scenes.

http://pro.sony.com....prod.php?id=740
http://www.uemedia.n...cle_15521.shtml
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#10 Jamie Metzger

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 03:03 AM

You could use the T-block version (HKC-T950) of the F950 where the lens and optical / CCD block is separate from the camera body, but you'd have one cable from the T-block to the camera body and another from the camera to the HDCAM-SR recorder. "Crank" used this to shoot a lot of action scenes.

http://pro.sony.com....prod.php?id=740
http://www.uemedia.n...cle_15521.shtml



makes sense. Now how about the mount that let's the camera spin 720 in pretty much any direction? Do you know offhand if this is flyable?
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#11 Aaron Farrugia

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 06:10 AM

the AR is the way to go rotation is easy but for it to flip upside down u have me there

this would throw the rig out of balance
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#12 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 15 October 2006 - 05:52 PM

I know Ken Ferro personally, and he told me that he used a gyro/rotation device thing that he held on his steadicam. It was supposed to emulate a bullet, so I assume the rig spun as he walked.

You should ask him what he used. There's no reason to re-invent the wheel if this is something that's already been done.
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