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812 FILTER


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#1 J Costantini

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 06:56 AM

Hi.
I'll be shooting this shortfilm in the woods surrounded by very green trees shooting a very white actor.
Dramatically I'd like to have this part of the story warmer than usual and I considered using a 812 filter on the lens.
Anybody has pictures (examples) of what this filter looks like? I have an idea but I'd like to see other examples of it in use. I believe it warms the skintones but what would happen to the foliage and trees and sky?
Is the image too "pink" when you use the 812? I'll be shooting with 7246 (old 250D).

Thanks a lot.

Edited by nillo, 13 October 2006 - 06:57 AM.

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#2 Ram Shani

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 07:10 AM

hi

you can look at one of the filter companes web sits here on the links thay have pics
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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 08:06 AM

An 812 filter is a very subtle warming effect. Try South London Filters for more info.

You could also look at Coral, Straw, Chocolate, Sepia, Antique Suede and Tobacco. They all come in varying strengths. Choose the one that suits your story best.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 11:24 PM

I don't bother with slight warming filters when shooting color neg -- the colorist or the person making the print can easily remove the effect or make it even stronger, so it's not worth the extra glass in front of the lens. I mean, just to preserve the effect in dailies, you'd have to shoot the grey scale without the 812 and then add it for the scene, so you might as well just shoot the grey scale with an opposite pale blue filter and then pull it for the scene to get a warmer look. And in terms of how pink or orange that warm color is, that's also easily tweaked in post color-timing.

After seeing people use pale warming filters only to get their dailies back from the lab looking neutral, and also seeing 1st answer prints of movies that I shot with warming filters that were timed neutral, and then having to time back to the warmth in the following prints ("a little more yellow... now a little more magenta..."), I realized that I might as well have shot it clean and timed the warmth in when doing the dailies and the later answer prints.
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