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Shooting a TV for compositing in post.


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#1 Drew Hoffman

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 03:19 PM

I was wondering what the best way to shoot a television screen with the intent of compositing an image on it during post production. I AC'd on a show that did something like that and they put orange stickers on each of the corners and one in the center of the screen. I'm assuming that in editing, they would use the dots as a reference to tack the image onto the screen. Is this the best way to do it or is there something else I might want to try? Can I move the camera at all during the shot or is it better to have it locked off?
Thank you.
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#2 Jim Malone

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 12:08 AM

Keeping the shot locked off could save a lot of work in post, but it depends on what the shot requires. If you need a moving shot you would have to track it and stickers in the corners is not a bad idea. If it is a static shot though it should be pretty easy to throw something up on the screen without any tracking markers or special preparations.
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#3 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 17 October 2006 - 12:41 AM

On a project I did when the TV was a predominant item throughout, the effects people had us place green screen material on the TV with tracking marks so they could key in either the TV picture or when the TV was off, rebuild the reflective look of the screen (minus the lights and camera).


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#4 Drew Hoffman

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 01:38 AM

(Don't mind the gaffer's box some bored grips made my gaffer ;) )


That's actually my favorite part of the picture...

Thanks for the input, I was talking with an editor today and he said to do the same thing.
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#5 Keith Mottram

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 06:01 AM

I tend to hate the majority of post tv shots and the main reason is the way in which they are done- basically the way described. the problem with the method of sticking some green or blue with dots on is that you have no reference for reflections or colour density. it actually makes little difference if you put dots straight onto a switched off tv or onto greenscreen as once you have the tracking marks its pretty simple to do a warped super. however if talent is crossing over the screen it could save some roto time. what i'd advocate doing is haveing the screen fed a blue or green signal and the shoot the tv live. this way with a good primatte key for example you'll be left with reflections and the compositor will have a reference for any change in color density accross the screen which will greatly enhance the believability of the shot.

keith
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#6 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 07:06 AM

the best way to get source for reflections is to shoot it black (essentially just turned off). this can easily be composited over the added footage to look very accurate. if the budget is slim or the post turnaround is tight, then the greenscreen with tracking markers is probably the way to go.

in my opinion, the best way to go, if quality is paramount, is to shoot it with the tv simply off, with small white or orange tracking markers adhered to the screen (though this will require the edge of the screen to be roto'd). i would suggest also shooting a few seconds of the tv with random footage playing for the compositor to reference, especially for the subtle reflected light/color on the edge/trim around the edge of the glass screen (the lack of this is often what makes tv composites seem fake).

hope this helps.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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