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Loose handle on a Beaulieu 4008 ZM 2


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#1 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 04:00 AM

So I bought a Beaulieu 4008 ZM 2 from eBay and it arrived today in the mail. One of the first things I noticed about the camera is that the handle is somewhat loose but I can't figure out where I tighten it down at. Can someone help me out please.

Justin
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#2 Glenn Brady

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 06:55 AM

The leatherette cover on the bottom plate of the grip must be removed to expose four slotted screws that secure the plate to the grip. Once the screws are backed out, this plate ican be removed and the battery switch moved out of the way, allowing you to access the single machine screw that fastens the grip to the camera body. It's an easy fix.
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#3 Justin Aguirre

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 12:46 PM

Thanks Glenn!

Justin
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#4 Tomas Stacewicz

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 03:22 PM

So, it's easy to remove the handle then?

What if, I would like to remove the handle? What should I take into consideration? There are a number of functions in the handle, right? Is it easy to safely do this modification yourself (removal of handle)?

I don't own a 4008 myself, but I am planning to buy one. The only thing I am not happy with about this model is the handle.

So there is a battery switch there? What else? I recall that you stick in the key to disable/enable the Wratten gelatine filter, right?
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#5 Glenn Brady

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 03:44 PM

Hi, Tomas.

Tightening the handle is very easy, but removing it permanently isn't. The only functions in the handle are, as you suggest, the three-position battery switch (intermittent run, locked out, and locked on) and the filter key slot. Removing the switch requires that the camera body be opened up, the body drilled to accept another kind of switch, and the wiring reconnected properly. If the wiring is connect so that the battery is on all the time, the guillotine shutter won't stop reliably in the closed position, resulting in film fogging and a momentarily dark viewfinder. Cameras that have had the grip removed probably have had the built-in filters removed as well, making the filter 'button' on the base of the body non-functional.

Have you considered just buying one of the readily available, bolt-on extension grips? They make the stubby grip much more secure and comfortable, especially when a wrist strap is used as well.
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#6 Bernie O'Doherty

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Posted 14 October 2006 - 04:49 PM

[Hi Justin,

When I service the cameras I normally ask the customer if he needs the built-in 85 filter/clear filter. I think it's best to remove both, since they do get misty and dirty over time and can degrade the image. Also some people just wanted to put a filter up-front the lens. This way it seems easier to remember if your little handle slide is this way or that.
Cheers, Bernie
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