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How to mimick firelight and daylight?


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#1 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 12:15 AM

Hi,

I'm Jamie I'm 18, from England and in film school in LA. Im fairly new here and i have been browsing some posts and it looks like this is a good forum to chat and glean much needed information to help me suceed in this cut throat industry.

Right, I'm DP'ing a small project in film school. We are using a Canon XL-1, basic lighting, basic grip etc etc. I need to create a firelight effect in a small, quaint victorian room which will fill two actors. I was told to use some Kino Flo's for the daylight but i'm not too sure. I need to recreate daylight in a way so it looks like two characters are dining in a cafe. It will be shot on an interior stage.

Any help with this would be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Jamie.
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#2 Don Homewood

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 02:07 AM

Well the easy, low budget way to do firelight is simply have a light with orange gel, on a dimmer. Use the dimmer to create a flicker. Or, alternately, forget the dimmer and just wiggle something, like your fingers, around in front of the light.
As far as the daylight goes, that's really up to you. Sunlight is generally a very hard light source, and kinos are a soft source. Think about the story, about what time of day it is, what the weather is like, etc. Kinos would be appropriate for an overcast day. Your lighting should always serve the story, try not to think just about "How could I light this?"
Good luck with the project. Post some stills of your set-ups when it's over.

Edited by Don Homewood, 24 October 2006 - 02:08 AM.

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#3 Jamie McIntyre

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 03:45 AM

Well the easy, low budget way to do firelight is simply have a light with orange gel, on a dimmer. Use the dimmer to create a flicker. Or, alternately, forget the dimmer and just wiggle something, like your fingers, around in front of the light.
As far as the daylight goes, that's really up to you. Sunlight is generally a very hard light source, and kinos are a soft source. Think about the story, about what time of day it is, what the weather is like, etc. Kinos would be appropriate for an overcast day. Your lighting should always serve the story, try not to think just about "How could I light this?"
Good luck with the project. Post some stills of your set-ups when it's over.


Ahh thank you. i should have mentioned its like a partly cloudy day, we dont see any of the sky, but the lighting could (i suppose) could be lit for overcast. I can get my hands on some kino flo's so that should be great. It's just a 20 second shot of two people ina cafe, im going to completley over expose it anyway as it is a flash forward to the future but you have helped me no end with the firelight

:) Thank you,

I will post some stills too! :)
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#4 James W

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 03:55 AM

In regards to the fire light I always find that the dimmer and/or wiggley finger techniques don't seem organic enough.

Something I saw a German DP do was use a small frame (about 50cm) and then fix gold metalic foil really loosely into the frame, shoot an orange gelled 1K into the foil and have the Spark gentley move the frame. The reflected light was a good firey like colour and the feeling of concious human movement was lost due to the baggy foil flapping about.

Good luck!
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#5 Don Homewood

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Posted 24 October 2006 - 04:14 AM

^^^^^ James speaks the truth.

If you have the means for a set-up like this, go for it. He's absolutely right about the methods I mentioned looking artificial. I just assumed from your original post that you had very limited resources.
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#6 Wilkin Chau

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 04:16 AM

For Firelight you could also use a flicker generator. It's usually a small black box which attaches to the light and then to the power source. It has various switches on it to vary the rate of flicker. Flicker generators can also be used to mimic the lighting effect of someone watching a TV.
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