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16mm B&W ghosting


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#1 kelly tippett

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Posted 21 October 2006 - 11:59 PM

I think it is called halation? I'm planning to buy 7266 tri-x but became aware that there might be some ghosting, b/c B&W film is bad about getting the reflection coming in off the gate/plate. Besides correcting the gate/plate problem what 16mm B&W reversal helps prevent the ghosting effect.
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 06:59 AM

I think it is called halation? I'm planning to buy 7266 tri-x but became aware that there might be some ghosting, b/c B&W film is bad about getting the reflection coming in off the gate/plate. Besides correcting the gate/plate problem what 16mm B&W reversal helps prevent the ghosting effect.


The ghosting effect is a reflection off of the pressure plate, hence why the older 16mm cameras had their gates painted black. The only solution is, frankly, to paint it black.

There is only 1 stock I know of with the anti-ghosting layer available for 16mm, and that is Fomapan.
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#3 Bryan Darling

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 01:21 PM

I've shot thousands of feet of black & white and must say I never hand any issues myself.
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#4 kelly tippett

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 01:35 PM

Thanks for helping ya'll.
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 01:43 PM

As far as I'm aware all film has had an anti-halation layer for years. It's the blackish coating on the base and it dissolves in processing.
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#6 ryan_bennett

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Posted 22 October 2006 - 02:02 PM

Ahh, Tri-x and Plus-x both have anti-halation for years probably since they were first made. A lot of ghosting can still happen if there's a problem with the pressure plate not set correctly so make sure it's firm. All films have this backing and can be prone to this not just black and white and thus why they have the anti-halation layer. Fomapan only advertise they have the layer.
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#7 Chris Keth

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Posted 26 October 2006 - 04:09 PM

I think it is called halation? I'm planning to buy 7266 tri-x but became aware that there might be some ghosting, b/c B&W film is bad about getting the reflection coming in off the gate/plate. Besides correcting the gate/plate problem what 16mm B&W reversal helps prevent the ghosting effect.



This can happen with any film, not only black and white. The amount of halation is going to increase with gross local overexposure, so to minimize it, just don't overexpose light sources, skies, etc any more than you have to.
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