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House of Flying Daggers-violent beauty


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 01:28 AM

I saw again recently, The House of Flying Daggers and was awestruck by the beautiful cinematography contained within it. Few films have effected me in this way. Apacolypes Now was one and there were a few others. I have heard that many Asian filmmakers were influenced by bamboo painting and their use of negitive space. I am facinated with this concept and even more so as I am planning a shoot in the desert and want to emulate some of these techniques for my film. I found the contrast of violence and horror in juxtaposition with natural beauty mesnerizing and artistically invigorating. I think this was part of the success of another great Asian film Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. What are your thoughts on this or on these films in general. How do you think think the directors achieved this juxtaposition or was it the cinematographers who were responsible for this magic? Also are there other films you think achieved this artistic balancing act between horror and beauty. I know Darrio Argenta did so in a different way or style if you like. Susperia is almost pushing this concept to the edge of the envelope. Any thought? B)
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#2 Marek Stricek

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 03:24 AM

I think that "Hero" from Zhang Yimou may fall in the same category.
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#3 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 27 October 2006 - 01:58 PM

Also are there other films you think achieved this artistic balancing act between horror and beauty. I know Darrio Argenta did so in a different way or style if you like. Susperia is almost pushing this concept to the edge of the envelope. Any thought? B)


---I'm more familiar with Japanese samurai films--chambara, an onomatopoeia for the sound of swishing swords.

Horror specific try 'Onebaba' and 'Kwaidan'.
'Seppaku' AKA 'Harakiri' while not horror is afine blend of beauty and violence.

Try the Lone wolf and Cub series.
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#4 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 01:50 PM

---Since many contemporary horror films are about psychopathic killers, watch 'Sword of Doom'.

A propery trained samurai should be able to write poetry.
Its the sword and chysanthemum thing.

Zatoichi, the blind swordsman, movies are entertaining.
Shintaro Katsu, Zatoichi, also produced the first three Lone Wolf and Cub movies.
Tomisaburo Wakayama, the star of them is Shintaro Katsu's brother.
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#5 Stuart McCammon

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 04:18 PM

The beauty of House of Flying Daggers - photography, costumes, props, sets - made the acting only that much more painful to watch. How did it end? I had to turn it off - couldn't handle the bad acting)
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