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buying a Super16mm camera.


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#1 Brendan mk Uegama

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 02:41 AM

I have been thinking about buying a camera that shoots Super16mm. I'm not yet sure on what type. But to own one is not only an expensive purchase, but the maintenance can be very costly. Is buying a camera going to be of a high advantage to me? Because in general, once you're hired onto a production, the camera is usually rented from a camera house.

I feel like it would be a good idea because I would learn more about the camera than I would if I didn't own one. For those of you who own a 16mm or 35mm camera, is it a large asset? Do you shoot more because of it? Do you feel it makes you a better cinematographer in some ways?

Any opinions would be helpful.
Thanks.

Edited by Brendan mk Uegama, 29 October 2006 - 02:41 AM.

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#2 Chance Shirley

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 04:12 PM

This question has been asked before -- search the archives for opinions.

Personally, I own a S16 camera, mainly because there's no local place for me to rent one. If I could easily rent a S16 camera when I needed it, I'd go that route.
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#3 Matthew Buick

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 05:02 PM

I believe the cheapest Super 16 Camera is the Krasnogorsk K3, with a Super 16 gate put in, that in total would probably cost around $500, you may also want to widen the viewfinder, which may add another $300.

Hope this helps,
Matthew Buick.
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#4 Mark Heim

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 11:39 PM

I own two different bolexs and a K3 and I'm glad I made the investment. I am able to go out and shoot a roll whenever I feel like it for practice. It allows me to try things I wouldnt be able to do on a busy set. I can test film stocks, different light setups, whatever. I have only shot 2 short films with them, niether were sync sound. But usually when I want to shoot an actual film, I rent better equipment.

Owning equipment has given more chances to practice shooting, so in a way it is making me a better cinematographer I think.
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