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posted in 16mm, maybe at the wrong place...


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#1 Christophe Collette

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 03:54 PM

Hi everyone, I am shooting a R&B video on thurday, location is a 1960's looking bungalow, the director wants a bluish look, cold but not too much, no grain, very clean imagery. Color is based on the opening of this video by Martin de Thurah: . All I shot until now are very moody videos, grain was not a concern and I didn't have much lighting involved. This time is quite different. Lighting will involve practicals (regular household bulbs) and fresnels. Should I filter the light sources or the lens?? I am thinking of shooting tungstene balanced film, maybe 7217, would a 1/4 blue do it for the light? What filter should I use if filtering on the lens, I don't want to be to heavy handed. Also, the lighting on this opening scene is fairly simple, it seems to me there is just one source, pretty large on the left side, but I'd like to know your opinion on what was used there. I am a photographer and to me this looks like a source bounced in a glossy white or even soft silver umbrella. I'd also love to use a beauty dish for the shooting, it's a soft reflector/dish, does that exist in film gear or is that just photo flash lighting accessories? Thanks for you help.
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#2 janusz sikora

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 06:28 PM

Hi everyone, I am shooting a R&B video on thurday, location is a 1960's looking bungalow, the director wants a bluish look, cold but not too much, no grain, very clean imagery. Color is based on the opening of this video by Martin de Thurah: . All I shot until now are very moody videos, grain was not a concern and I didn't have much lighting involved. This time is quite different. Lighting will involve practicals (regular household bulbs) and fresnels. Should I filter the light sources or the lens?? I am thinking of shooting tungstene balanced film, maybe 7217, would a 1/4 blue do it for the light? What filter should I use if filtering on the lens, I don't want to be to heavy handed. Also, the lighting on this opening scene is fairly simple, it seems to me there is just one source, pretty large on the left side, but I'd like to know your opinion on what was used there. I am a photographer and to me this looks like a source bounced in a glossy white or even soft silver umbrella. I'd also love to use a beauty dish for the shooting, it's a soft reflector/dish, does that exist in film gear or is that just photo flash lighting accessories? Thanks for you help.


You never say if your location has any daylight coming in...? If yes, then you could just go straight tungsten without 85.
If this is all tungsten, then you could use one of lighter Kodak Wratten CC filters on the lens... like Blue CC-10B or - if you want cold look - Cyan - CC10C. I think that for what you want going with Wratten on the lens is a better choice than filering lights... faster, cleaner, less expensive and better looking since color on the lens impairs that color to overall image whereas filtering lights would create localized patches. If you find yourself being short on light shoot straight tungsten and do color in telecine (but then it is not yours)
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#3 Christophe Collette

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 07:41 PM

Hi, thanks for the help, true... I might have to deal with natural light coming through the windows, I have not seen the location yet. Solution could be to filter every lights to daylight then, and shoot with a blue filter on the lens, I'd like something that is just slightly cold, I do not want to shoot full tungstene correction, are there any milder corrections than #80. I am sorry for asking this, I just have plain zero knowledge about temperature correction filters, I never use them as a photographer.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 07:52 PM

Simplest thing for day interiors would be to use tungsten film (200T is a good choice) and light with HMI's and daylight Kinos, and then just filter the camera for a halfway correction (81EF for example.)
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#5 Christophe Collette

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 08:48 PM

Thanks a lot David!! Good advice!
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 09:26 PM

Thanks a lot David!! Good advice!


Make sure you shoot a greyscale under daylight (5500K) lighting with the full 85 correction filter (or under a tungsten lamp) so that the following footage with the halfway correction looks blue-ish in comparison, especially if you won't be there for the transfer to video.
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#7 Christophe Collette

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 10:08 AM

Thanks again! I will be there for the transfert, should work fine!

Christophe
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