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Indoor pool lighting


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#1 ljoski johnsen

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 10:54 PM

hi,

I'm shooting a short film taking place at an indoor swimming pool. It's quite a big space and there are a bunch of lights from the top. I'm not quite sure what kind of light they are, but they look like the typical light for indoor pools. They are definitely cooler than tungsten lamps. I'm wondering if those lights have interrupted spectrum because just by looking at from naked eyes each has slightly different colors. I'm guessing it's the color inaccuracy over the age. Does anybody know this kind of light and the charactristics of it?
I am now thinking to keep those lights on and have HMI backlightings, and chinese lanterns with daylight bulbs in for close-ups to keep things simple. It is all day interior scenes. Or, should I turn the overhead lights off and light the scene from scratch? I'm shooting on Super16 and the director wants the scene to be high-key.
Thanks in advance!

Ljorski

Austin TX

Edited by ljoski johnsen, 29 October 2006 - 10:58 PM.

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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 11:40 PM

I have seen 3 types of lights in pool areas. 1. sodium vapor 2. Meurcury Halide 3. Florescent.

sodium vapor is unlikley, since they are definatley much redder than tungsten. Floros would be obvious so your probably looking at meurcury halide. They have a significant greenspike and are around 5500K.


Since the director is looking for high-key, I would leave them on, use an R40 filter on camera and put 1/2 or 1 plus green on the HMI's/Chineese lanterns you use. The other option is to put neg green on every lantern, but that would be a pain in the ass. (I assume there are a ton of them, and not very accessible)

Color inacuracy due to age or even manufacturer varience is possible. You can replace all the bulbs to match them, or just leave them be. In general there are so many lamps so far away in a pool that the light blends, and the only visible effect of slightly off bulbs will only be visible in on-screen lamps (which the viewer will understand, we all have seen mis-matched bulbs. adds to the reality)
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#3 ljoski johnsen

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 10:45 AM

Michael, thank you for your advice. I'll most likely keep the marcury halide on and try to match other lights with it.

Ljoski
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