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talking about lens


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#1 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 02:24 AM

hi
If i'm concerned only[b] by definition which one is the best cook or master prime?
what is your experience about those lens?
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#2 Max Jacoby

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 04:12 AM

There is no better lens per se, they just give you different looks that's all.

The Master Primes are technically speaking the best lenses out there, bar none. They are sharper at T1.3 than all other lenses at T2.8, they don't flare, don't really distort, don't breathe, have great contrast (in a sense that the blacks are very black and the whites are very white) and always give you perfectly round out-of-focus highlights, even if you stop down. In a sense the image that they give you is very neutral, because most of the optical-design 'problems' (which give a lens it's character) have gotten rid of. They represent the world very much like your eyes perceive it as well.

Cooke on the other hand have a different design philosophy than Zeiss. Instead of looking for technical perfection, they are more interested by the look. The Cooke S4s are the lenses which give the most three-dimensional image I find. They look especially nice on faces. But the problem I have with Cooke lenses is their very gradual focus fall-off which means that on the big screen the difference between what's sharp and what's not sharp is not always obvious and this at times leaves you wondering where you're supposed to look (i.e. where the focus is). I much prefer the look of Zeiss lenses and their quick focus fall-off, because your eyes are guided much more towards the sharp part of the image.

That said you'll find that different Dops like different lenses. Some lighting styles work better with some lenses than others. If you use very contrasty lighting for instance to guide the viewers' eyes towards the part of he frame you want him to look at, this compensates the slightly softer look of the Cooke S4s. On the other hand if you have a high-key and flatter image this lack of sharpness of the Cookes will be more obvious.
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#3 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 04:36 AM

thanks max,
has i have a neutral look to render i'll better choose the zeiss.
thanks for sharing yor experience.
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Visual Products

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport