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#1 Drew Hoffman

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 06:08 PM

One time on a production, a grip was kind enough to show me all of the different kinds of diffusion they had in 4x4 frames and give a rundown of what they did and when a DP was likely to call for it. He mentioned that a lot of DP's hate using silk and rarely ask for it.
I've noticed on other productions, that although there are plenty of silks on the carts, they're never really used. The only time I've really seen it in action is when it's in a 12x12 frame or something along those lines... even then, when the production can afford a variety of rags, they'll put up something besides silk. I was wondering if this was a true statement about silk and what the reason for it is.
Thank you.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 03:55 AM

Silks are fine outdoors for diffusing sunlight -- they make less noise in the wind than some other materials, for example -- but there are not very efficient diffusers. You put a big light behind a silk and generally you see a star-shaped pattern of the light spreading. I always imagine what sort of soft light that is, a fuzzy star-shaped soft light, and the sort of shadows that makes. I'd rather use diffusers that spread light evenly from the point of origin. But there is definitely a more "organic" feeling to the soft light created by passing through the weave of fabrics.
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#3 J. Lamar King

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 03:59 PM

I have worked with some DP's who seem to have a hate for it too. I'll commonly use a 2x3 silk with a tweenie near the camera to fill in up to a two shot but when I go for a bigger frame and light used as a key I always go to grid or 216 etc. But I don't hate silk and surely use it. It's less efficient though like David said.
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#4 Brian Wells

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Posted 14 November 2006 - 01:03 AM

I'm nowhere near as experienced as the other members on this forum, but I'll voice my support for 216 as well. There's something very attractive about the light quality from an HMI or Kino Flo with a 216 diffusion frame that moves me in a way silks do not. That's not to say I don't see the value in having both as an option, but on a recent project I never even used the silk because the diffusion was so pretty!
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#5 brian hendry

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 01:31 AM

ive worked for loads of keys and gaffers, and we dont use silks so much....we do use them when we are maybe using some ultra bounce and we will lay the silk on top of the ultra and what not to slow it down some.

i hardly ever use silk 4x's....mostly the run of 216, 250, opal, light grid and so on.
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#6 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 11 January 2007 - 07:42 PM

ive worked for loads of keys and gaffers, and we dont use silks so much....we do use them when we are maybe using some ultra bounce and we will lay the silk on top of the ultra and what not to slow it down some.

i hardly ever use silk 4x's....mostly the run of 216, 250, opal, light grid and so on.


What is "ultra-bounce"? Thanks.
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#7 Steve Larsen

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Posted 12 January 2007 - 03:25 PM

One time on a production, a grip was kind enough to show me all of the different kinds of diffusion they had in 4x4 frames and give a rundown of what they did and when a DP was likely to call for it. He mentioned that a lot of DP's hate using silk and rarely ask for it.
I've noticed on other productions, that although there are plenty of silks on the carts, they're never really used. The only time I've really seen it in action is when it's in a 12x12 frame or something along those lines... even then, when the production can afford a variety of rags, they'll put up something besides silk. I was wondering if this was a true statement about silk and what the reason for it is.
Thank you.


I think the two diffusions have two different purposes, A silk (avialable in full ,1/2 & 1/4) will allow you to see the source you put through it. The result is a softened shadow with a clear feeling of the source direction. 216 & Light grid diffuse the light a lot more evenly at there is very soft shadow and a little feeling of the source direction. That being said if it is night and there is a 216 4x4 on an 18k 100 yards away the light will still be extremely sourcey. The softness of a source is directly proportional to it's size compared to the subjects.
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#8 brian hendry

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 07:06 PM

What is "ultra-bounce"? Thanks.


its a rag that is used to bounce light back into something or somewhere...kinda like a b/w griff....ultra bounce is white on one side and black on the other. great rag....dear lord im horrible at trying to explain myself sometimes. ha
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#9 Rick Kelly

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 12:26 AM

What is "ultra-bounce"? Thanks.


Advantage Grip lists it as: The photographic white surface is used for bounce while the black side can either block light or prevent ambient bounce. This product is similar to ClayCoat.

It isn't shiny like a black/white griff. Almost reminds me of foam core. Most D.P.s I work with call for it to bounce the fill light. Very Nice.
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