Jump to content


Photo

lighting for 16mm


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 kelly tippett

kelly tippett
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Other
  • Columbus, Mississippi

Posted 04 November 2006 - 03:28 AM

I'm going to be using 16mm in a feature with a lot more than one location. (hope cam tests go good) I've done some reg 8 years back, and spr 8mm, but this time I'm going to need to understand lighting for 16mm. And I can control the fstops on this film camera- that freedom rocks. Are there any good light meters (inexpensive ones) out there that someone might suggest? And if so where at? Any other tips are very much welcome. If it helps, it Looks to be that I'll be using black and white, 7266. But color is not ruled out at this point plus maybe the next project will be color. The kodak url info on this b&w film is below.

http://www.kodak.com...s...8.8.4&lc=en
  • 0

#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 04 November 2006 - 07:02 PM

The Sekonic Studio Deluxe is a good beginners meter: http://www.sekonic.c...ucts.asp?ID=109

Be sure to check it against a higher end meter before using though, just to make sure it's accurate.

If you got the dough, get the Dual Master, it rocks, and it has a reflective meter as well

:)
  • 0

#3 Thanasis Diamantopoulos

Thanasis Diamantopoulos
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • greece

Posted 05 November 2006 - 01:21 PM

I'm going to be using 16mm in a feature with a lot more than one location. (hope cam tests go good) I've done some reg 8 years back, and spr 8mm, but this time I'm going to need to understand lighting for 16mm. And I can control the fstops on this film camera- that freedom rocks. Are there any good light meters (inexpensive ones) out there that someone might suggest? And if so where at? Any other tips are very much welcome. If it helps, it Looks to be that I'll be using black and white, 7266. But color is not ruled out at this point plus maybe the next project will be color. The kodak url info on this b&w film is below.

http://www.kodak.com...s...8.8.4&lc=en


HI

SECONIC is a very good exposure meter also minolta and gossen are also good enouph. Why are you shooting reversal film and not negatif? Reversal is good for first timers to learn exposure.
  • 0

#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 06 November 2006 - 02:14 AM

I didn't notice before, but yeah. If you're shooting a feature why are you shooting Reversal film?

Shoot negative, your post-production workflow will thank you for it

:)
  • 0

#5 kelly tippett

kelly tippett
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Other
  • Columbus, Mississippi

Posted 07 November 2006 - 01:58 AM

I'm going to mini dv and from what i understand negative has more grain. I'll take any advice.
  • 0

#6 Corey Bringas

Corey Bringas
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 07 November 2006 - 07:10 AM

so you're shooting a feature lenght film, with little to no understanding of lighting/film itself? I recommend you start by shooting some shorts.. I think there is a misunderstanding and that is probably what you are doing. In that case reversal is great to start with. It is great as a way to first get your hands dirty without having to fork out the money in post processing. BTW- negative does not have more grain. Negative is the standard when it comes to shooting anything of professional quality (unless you're going for the revearsal look of course.) Are you shooting super 16 or just 16? What camera? I typically like to over expose about a stop as I find this more accurately depicts the true rating of the stock. Give us more info about the project! Exteriors, Interiors, day/night?
  • 0

#7 kelly tippett

kelly tippett
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 64 posts
  • Other
  • Columbus, Mississippi

Posted 07 November 2006 - 07:05 PM

so you're shooting a feature lenght film... Give us more info about the project! Exteriors, Interiors, day/night?


Plenty of night scenes and interiors. Walking along street passing store fronts. A bar scene. Office shots, int. houses, Halls, apartments, hospital, police station (mock, really just a building with offices). And some day shots- doesn't matter if sunny or cloudy. I want it to look as if it was shot with available light not just clean lighting. Since it is black and white i will not have to worry too much about yellows and blues and white balance. That's not the reason I'm shooting black and white but that is the plus side of b&W. I've shot shorts with super 8, video, and I'm a still photographer. I used to develope my own black and white pics before the digital age became more practical. Now i use the nikon d1 digital. This is the first time using 16mm, very very first feature. I don't have a light meter anymore. I don't really need one now. I know how my still camera lights. Honestly, i don't like a light meter. I know one is needed, but that don't mean i have to like it. So its been a while since i've used one and I'm wondering since it is 16mm do i need to do anyhting different than if i was lighting for 35mm. And honestly any input at all will help.

http://smg.photobuck...gAnch=imgAnch60
<br>35mm still

Edited by kelly tippett, 07 November 2006 - 07:08 PM.

  • 0

#8 timHealy

timHealy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1252 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 07 November 2006 - 07:33 PM

I'm going to mini dv and from what i understand negative has more grain. I'll take any advice.


all film has grain, but the effects of it can be used creatively and controlled (reduced or increased) by exposure choices, film stock, and processing.

if you are shooting reversal you should work on understanding how the look of reversal will contribute to the film and story you are capturing compared to shooting on negative. if you lack the experience then shoot some tests and compare.

basically you can reduce grain by shooting on negative film with slower asa ratings and overexposing one half to one full f stop. but always test to see what works best for you.

best

tim
  • 0

#9 Thanasis Diamantopoulos

Thanasis Diamantopoulos
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • greece

Posted 07 November 2006 - 08:38 PM

Plenty of night scenes and interiors. Walking along street passing store fronts. A bar scene. Office shots, int. houses, Halls, apartments, hospital, police station (mock, really just a building with offices). And some day shots- doesn't matter if sunny or cloudy. I want it to look as if it was shot with available light not just clean lighting. Since it is black and white i will not have to worry too much about yellows and blues and white balance. That's not the reason I'm shooting black and white but that is the plus side of b&W. I've shot shorts with super 8, video, and I'm a still photographer. I used to develope my own black and white pics before the digital age became more practical. Now i use the nikon d1 digital. This is the first time using 16mm, very very first feature. I don't have a light meter anymore. I don't really need one now. I know how my still camera lights. Honestly, i don't like a light meter. I know one is needed, but that don't mean i have to like it. So its been a while since i've used one and I'm wondering since it is 16mm do i need to do anyhting different than if i was lighting for 35mm. And honestly any input at all will help.

http://smg.photobuck...gAnch=imgAnch60
<br>35mm still


Hi
You can use your still camera but its beter to use a lightmeter and specialy a spot meter any way reversal
as i was told is the best way to learn but negatif while you dont have a light meter is best to correct at the
post the exposure mistakes.
Have a nice shooting and enjoy it.
  • 0


Willys Widgets

CineLab

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Tai Audio

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Visual Products

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Opal

CineLab

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider