Jump to content


Photo

"The Proposition" DP'd by Benoit Delhomme


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Jonathan Bowerbank

Jonathan Bowerbank
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2815 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • San Francisco, CA

Posted 07 November 2006 - 04:11 PM

Has anyone seen the Aussie Western "The Proposition"?

It's a beautiful film, and a gritty one at that. It's definitely up there with the likes of "Unforgiven" and Sergio Leone westerns.

But I found Benoit Delhomme's work to be fantastic. He has some great frames where you'd swear the shot was a classic painting. I was especially impressed with the first exchange between Guy Pearce & John Hurt.

Go rent it if you haven't had the pleasure and tell me what you think.
  • 0

#2 Max Jacoby

Max Jacoby
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2955 posts
  • Other

Posted 07 November 2006 - 04:16 PM

Unfortunately I missed it in the theatres. If you like Benoit's work, check out 'Cyclo'.
  • 0

#3 Christophe Collette

Christophe Collette
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Montreal, Canada

Posted 09 November 2006 - 10:57 PM

Gorgeous photography on that movie, I am very much amazed by the night shots, I would like to know how he did this, I figure it is day for night, but if someone knows how he did it, I'd be great to share this. I also wondered if the film was transfered in DI. The color palette is amazing. Some day shots look ENR processed too.
  • 0

#4 Francesco Bonomo

Francesco Bonomo
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 366 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • currently in Rome, Italy

Posted 10 November 2006 - 12:54 AM

the movie wasn't distributed here in Italy, I had to buy the dvd from the UK in order to see it and I'm glad I did: it's a little gem.

I would like to know how he did this, I figure it is day for night


Christophe, check this out:

http://www.ascmag.co...siton/page1.php
  • 0

#5 Christophe Collette

Christophe Collette
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 177 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Montreal, Canada

Posted 15 November 2006 - 09:10 PM

Thanks a lot Francesco! It answered all my questions!
  • 0

#6 Adrian Correia

Adrian Correia
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 November 2006 - 10:19 PM

Jonathan,

Max is right, you should check Cyclo - stunning work. I loved The Proposition also...wonderful widescreen compositions and the interiors are fantastic as well - the bar scene with Hurt in particular. The entire photographic asthetic of that movie is perfect.
  • 0

#7 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 November 2006 - 01:39 PM

I second - or third "Cyclo"

His work on "The Scent Of Green Papaya" (Tran Anh Hung's first feature) is also very interesting.
Vietnam totally created on a French sound stage; when I first saw it I thought it was - well a bit too studio lit.
After I'd been to Vietnam I rented it again, and - actually he captured the "cranked up to 11" aspect of the light quite well for work done on a stage....

-Sam
  • 0

#8 Luke Allein

Luke Allein
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • P.A.

Posted 21 November 2006 - 06:49 PM

I saw it just the other day. Yeah, the cinematography is ridiculous. Really brought out the oranges and the desert colors.

I liked it a lot, but honestly I expected a little more after hearing so much hype about it. Maybe I have to see it again, it's been in my head for two days already which is usually a good sign that I'm gonna really like a movie. I recommend as well.

Ray Winstone is so good in just about everything.
  • 0

#9 Pablo Herrera

Pablo Herrera
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Director
  • Dallas, Tx

Posted 01 December 2006 - 11:59 AM

I usually kick myself when I miss such beautifully shot movie on the big screen. So I was happy to actually catch this in theaters. What wasnt good was that I was the only one there. No joke, seriously the only one.
This movie was great and I wish I wasnt so broke so that I could buy it now.
  • 0

#10 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 05 December 2006 - 04:38 PM

I saw the film in theatres with my buddy over the summer. We were two out of maybe a dozen, granted it was a matinee. I'm pretty sure the film tanked here in the U.S. As far as story and cinematography went, I thought both were excellent. My buddy thought it sucked. I loved the story, the "Australian Western" genre, and the awesome compositions, which were probably unnoticed by everyone in the theatre save myself. A lot of people that had gone to see it objected to the courseness, and graphic violence, which I agree were overdone. The F-word game that has probalby been going on since "Scarface" really has to end. It's great to use it for emphasis, but I can guarantee that the F-word was not that imbued in the vocabularies of anyone, be they Australian botany-bay derived or otherwise, until well into the 1940s (this movie was set in the 1890s I believe), probably around the time of WWII. The shots of the flies were great, the opening titles, which incorporated a lot of period photography, were superb and really set an excellent tone for the story as it opened. The disclaimer that some of the images contained might be offensive to Australian Aborigines was lame and I think that this disclaimer has really cemented my belief that all lawyers, everywhere, need to die ;-) The flies, which I learned from one of the above links weren't planned for but just happened to be going haywire during the shoot, were also excellent. The lashing sequence was powerful especially

SPOILER

when they were lashing the main character's little brother and they do a time disolve and you're expecting them to have finished whipping him when the man wipes the blood of the whip and it's actually only a cut going to lash 34 out of 100. I also really connected with the Police chief's wife and her little "piece of England". I totally got that, and I think the way they depicted that in the film was superbly done. My usual complaint about DIs and the DI process. I think, with the minimal CG they had here that it was completely unnecessary and it detracted from the pop of the colors. In such a beautfully lit and photographed film, anything digital is really cutting into the film look and the broad color gamut of negative film. It is a total shame that a movie such as this would go through something so unnecessary.

Regards,

~Karl Borowski
  • 0

#11 joel Peterson

joel Peterson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Australia

Posted 22 December 2006 - 07:06 PM

I saw the film in theatres with my buddy over the summer. We were two out of maybe a dozen, granted it was a matinee. I'm pretty sure the film tanked here in the U.S. As far as story and cinematography went, I thought both were excellent. My buddy thought it sucked. I loved the story, the "Australian Western" genre, and the awesome compositions, which were probably unnoticed by everyone in the theatre save myself. A lot of people that had gone to see it objected to the courseness, and graphic violence, which I agree were overdone. The F-word game that has probalby been going on since "Scarface" really has to end. It's great to use it for emphasis, but I can guarantee that the F-word was not that imbued in the vocabularies of anyone, be they Australian botany-bay derived or otherwise, until well into the 1940s (this movie was set in the 1890s I believe), probably around the time of WWII. The shots of the flies were great, the opening titles, which incorporated a lot of period photography, were superb and really set an excellent tone for the story as it opened. The disclaimer that some of the images contained might be offensive to Australian Aborigines was lame and I think that this disclaimer has really cemented my belief that all lawyers, everywhere, need to die ;-) The flies, which I learned from one of the above links weren't planned for but just happened to be going haywire during the shoot, were also excellent. The lashing sequence was powerful especially

SPOILER

when they were lashing the main character's little brother and they do a time disolve and you're expecting them to have finished whipping him when the man wipes the blood of the whip and it's actually only a cut going to lash 34 out of 100. I also really connected with the Police chief's wife and her little "piece of England". I totally got that, and I think the way they depicted that in the film was superbly done. My usual complaint about DIs and the DI process. I think, with the minimal CG they had here that it was completely unnecessary and it detracted from the pop of the colors. In such a beautfully lit and photographed film, anything digital is really cutting into the film look and the broad color gamut of negative film. It is a total shame that a movie such as this would go through something so unnecessary.

Regards,

~Karl Borowski



hi there
Just thought I would enlighten you re your reference to the Aboriginal disclaimer ...this is infact something that is in reference to tribal belief and practices and is not necessarily a legal thing in our western sense
and yes it was a very good film and Benoit did a sterling job :)
cheers
Joel
  • 0

#12 K Borowski

K Borowski
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3905 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • I.A.T.S.E. Local # 600 Eastern Region

Posted 19 January 2007 - 09:41 PM

hi there
Just thought I would enlighten you re your reference to the Aboriginal disclaimer ...this is infact something that is in reference to tribal belief and practices and is not necessarily a legal thing in our western sense
and yes it was a very good film and Benoit did a sterling job :)
cheers
Joel


Sorry for the late reply to this thread, but what tribal belief? I know that it wasn't a true disclaimer, but it still seemed like an awkward thing to throw in there. I think the white people in the film were portrayed far worse than the downtrodden, all-but-enslaved aborigines. If I were an aborigine, I wouldn't feel that my people were portrayed unrealistically from how any downtrodden group would have behaved.

~Karl
  • 0


CineTape

Opal

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Visual Products

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Glidecam

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Opal

CineLab

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC