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Ok new newbie Question.Using Filters on Camcorders


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#1 Dave Bailey

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 06:59 PM

I had posted a qu about the whole 24p ,trying to achieve that film look. Instead Id like to ask what can I do to footage Ive all ready shot using small sony hand camcorders. I edit in adobe 6.5 I have access to after effects. Is there some kind of formula I can use to achieve a good film look.

Ive done some work for a local band . They like my style but not the harsh home movie look of the video Ive shot. Hence my wanting to dive into the whole 3ccds and 24p cameras.

If you can please take a look at the video posted here and let me know what can I do if anything to give it a cleanier professional film look.

http://vids.myspace....eoid=1356866800

Also for a much latter qu I need to know why when I put my music videos Ive shot to dvd they come out chopy as hell.It plays like one frame every couple seconds . The audio stays but the Picture lags or just plain doesnt run.
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#2 Robert Price

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 12:31 AM

I asked a question about how to get that film look here once. Based on those answers and my expirence, I'd say that its difficult at best to "edit your way" to a film look. What you could do is turn up the saturation and contrast slightly. Also, movies (from what I understand) run at 24 fps. Try switching all your footage to 24fps.

Whats more important is just the physical elements of your footage. Basically, try to make it look like it wasn't shot with an amature video camera by having good lighting that shows edges, following the rules of composition (rule of thirds, etc), and try expirementing with different placements of objects. I really liked the low angle view of the drummer; that was done well.
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#3 Chris Durham

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 09:23 AM

They like my style but not the harsh home movie look of the video Ive shot. Hence my wanting to dive into the whole 3ccds and 24p cameras. If you can please take a look at the video posted here and let me know what can I do if anything to give it a cleanier professional film look.


A "harsh" look is kind of part of the gig with video. The picture's obviously better on 3ccd, motion looks better in 24p, and good optics do a lot; however the physics involved dictate your results. A smaller imaging surface - 1/3" CCD as opposed to 35mm - means means that you're basically going to get a crisper looking image. This isn't always a good thing. The deal is that you have a much larger depth of field with a smaller surface so everything in frame has a tendency to appear crisper than it would in film - which is distracting to the human eye even if the brain has trouble articulating what it is that's distracting. You get closer to a "film look" by paying attention to things like focus and lighting; however you should always be aware that you're not working with film. Play on the strengths of the medium.

When was the last time you heard a water colorist say he was going for an "oil paint look?"

And BTW, Dave, the rules here are that you post with your real name. The folks here are either professionals or folks like me - amateurs who conduct themselves professionally. They don't like it when people hide behind nicknames or handles.
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#4 Chris Durham

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 09:42 AM

I agree with the low angle on the drums. I will say that the switching between aspect ratios was kind of distracting. I generally prefer 16:9, but the 4:3 did add a bit to the feeling of enclosure of the car; however if that's what you were going for, you could have shot the whole thing 4:3 and just had the band stand closer together.
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#5 Dave Bailey

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 06:42 PM

I agree with the low angle on the drums. I will say that the switching between aspect ratios was kind of distracting. I generally prefer 16:9, but the 4:3 did add a bit to the feeling of enclosure of the car; however if that's what you were going for, you could have shot the whole thing 4:3 and just had the band stand closer together.


I wasnt going for that look . I was manning 3 cameras by myself 2 sonys an a Panasonic. The Pan was in widescreen . I was very upset by it.
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#6 Dave Bailey

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:45 AM

And BTW, Dave, the rules here are that you post with your real name. The folks here are either professionals or folks like me - amateurs who conduct themselves professionally. They don't like it when people hide behind nicknames or handles.
[/quote]


I realy like all the advice and help . To any one consirned with my Screen Name .
DAVE is taken. It wont let me enter just dave. So its the ( Handle ) or kick me off the board. Dont be such a drama queen. I am more than PROFESSIONAL enough . Its not me being fake or hiding . I just dont see the big deal .
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 10:55 AM

I just dont see the big deal .


If it's not a big deal... then just use your first and last name here.
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