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Common Lens Selection


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#1 Lukeo

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Posted 08 November 2006 - 11:49 PM

Hey,

I'm wondering what are some of the most common lenses used for feature length films? I understand each film has unique lenses that are used for special purposes. But what is the usual selection? I know that it must be a 70mm, or 100mm for over the shoulders and close ups, and possibly 28mm for master shots? Does anyone have specific numbers?

I'd like to do a video in the future with the Canon xl2 with the lens adapter to use Canon EF lenses. I understand there is a cropping effect that happens with film lenes to digital SLR's because the image sensors are not as big as a 35mm negative, same thing on the XL2 i presume? How do the 1/3 ccds compare to an aps sized sensor?

Thanks

Luke
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#2 Tim Tyler

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 12:12 AM

Luke,

This forum requires you use your full name as the display name.
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#3 Hal Smith

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 03:01 AM

i'd love to help you, but the fact that i don't know your last name causes me to relapse back to the argentinian cival war, completely paralyzing me. luke, you're a total a**ho** who doesn't deserve a real response.

Your post demonstrates the strongest reason for first and last names - it slows jerks like you from posting flames while hiding behind screen names like "Best Western". But hopefully Natural Selection will soon take care of the problem - I'm assuming you also don't follow other sensible rules like obeying NO PASSING zones.
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#4 Brian Woods

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 08:04 PM

oh really, hal? is that what you were assuming? you called me a jerk and falsely accused me of hiding behind a fake name. my name is brian woods and i was simply commenting on the fact that a person, with a genuine question, was looking for a genuine response and couldn't get one, probably negating the entire reason for this forums existance. i'm sure you had no idea and next time i'll dumb it down for you.

if you feel strongly on this matter, feel free to send me an email and i'll discuss it with you in a more civil manner, if you're capable.

softaminal@yahoo.com
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#5 Luke McMillian

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 11:48 PM

Hey,

Sorry I didn't know a last name was required. I've been posting on here for a while and no one ever asked about my last name. Now get to the answering! haha just kidding.

Thanks

Luke McMillian
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#6 Chris Keth

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 05:46 PM

Hey,

I'm wondering what are some of the most common lenses used for feature length films? I understand each film has unique lenses that are used for special purposes. But what is the usual selection? I know that it must be a 70mm, or 100mm for over the shoulders and close ups, and possibly 28mm for master shots? Does anyone have specific numbers?

I'd like to do a video in the future with the Canon xl2 with the lens adapter to use Canon EF lenses. I understand there is a cropping effect that happens with film lenes to digital SLR's because the image sensors are not as big as a 35mm negative, same thing on the XL2 i presume? How do the 1/3 ccds compare to an aps sized sensor?

Thanks

Luke


That tends to be a personal thing that every DP does differently. I like 40 to be my "normal" length. 75 is generally my OTS length and 100 is generally my singles length. I arrely use wider than a 25, but an 18 is soemtimes needed to get the job done. I don't particularly care for very wide angle lenses. I tend to go a bit longer than most people I know. This changes with every picture, though.
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#7 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 02:41 PM

How do the 1/3 ccds compare to an aps sized sensor?


They're about the same as 8mm film.
So a 12mm lens would be equilvalent to a 25mm "normal" in the 16mm format.
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#8 Danny Lachman

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 10:31 PM

You should look into a 35mm adapter because using regular 35mm lenses directly on the XL camera won't really let you exploit the lenses - with a RedRockMicro for example - you get pretty minimal change in the angle of view of the lenses.

say a 24mm with 84 degrees on 35mm would go to about a 75mm angle on the Redrock so you still get to go pretty wide. Unlike using it directly on the camera like someone else already said.

My personal selection of lenses goes as follows: 18mm, 24mm, 50mm, and 70-210mm nikkors. I probably could use either a 28 or 35mm lens too but I don't have one.

My suggestion: Go with 28mm, 50mm, and 105mm - that's pretty standard in the candid still photographer business.
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#9 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 12:54 AM

The basic must have 3 (35mm format)-35mm, 50mm, 75mm (can substitute 80mm for 75mm or zoom lens for all but not recommended) (fast lenses if possible). the next most needed-22mm , 100mm. The nice to have-18mm, 25mm (can substitute 28mm), 150mm, zoom lens focal length range to taste. The round out the package-28mm (can substitute 25mm), 80mm (can substitute 75mm), 125mm, 200mm, 300mm. B)
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#10 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 02:02 PM

Let's compare 35mm still and 1.85:1.

The still format is 24mm x 36mm, in a slide mount that gets cropped to 23mm x 33mm
35mm 1.85:1 is 11.33mm x 20.96mm.

Since vertical is the critical dimension (it determines the set up; close up, waist shot, knee shot...)the conversion factor would be 2x. 23/11.33

50mm is considered normal and most point&shoots have a 35mm.
That 50mm is equivalent to a 25mm in 1.85:1 and that 35mm, an 18mm.
So the 25mm for 1.85:1 is not merely a nice lens to have, but a necessity.
A 14mm would be nice to have.
A 40mm or 50mm for close ups and a 75mm or 85mm for tight close ups.

As Michael Chapman supposedly said to Martin Scorsese while working on 'Raging Bull', long lenses are "...elitist, immoral, and possibly even corrupt".
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