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Compositing help needed


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#1 tony powell

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 12:29 PM

I recently shot a film on standard 16mm and which we later had telecined to a digital format for editing.
Restrictions due to the complete lack of lighting kit and tripods meant that in one of our interior shots their is a glare from the key light on a wooden door, unfortunate, but there was nothing could be done about it at the time.
I tried compositing this out using combustion, which seemed to have worked very well when played back on my monitor, or a TV, but when blown up and projected on a full size screen didn't look so good.
My question is, how can anyone do things like this successfully unless they are able to constantly check their results by blowing up the frame to full projection size to see what it looks like ? Surely there must be some way of doing it.
Any suggestions gratefully appreciated
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#2 Michael Collier

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 02:30 PM

You can window into a small part of the screen (in effect making an area of interest the same physical size on your TV as it would be when projected) That may not help too much though, you may be suffering from the lack of color space on a TV. rough edges are evened out when put through the NTSC 'color safe' filter. When you project on a bigscreen your most likely going through the computer to a projector with no NTSC standards imposed at all (may not be true, depending on your actual playout regime) I would recomend looking very closely at your computer monitor (use the zoom tool to look closer). Have it set up with an RGB calibrator. then test it on a plasma if you have access.
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#3 Rolfe Klement

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 06:03 PM

Learn to love the waveform monitors
Import and work in 10 bit - export in 10 bit
Do the least you can
Learn to love LUTs
The human eye is very forgiving except for Peripheral motion -from our days of being hunters- so keep Peripheral wobbles (motion and color) to a minimum

Saves expensive film outs - I last did this on Kinky Boots titles

thanks

Rolfe
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#4 tony powell

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 11:26 AM

Hi Michael,

Many thanks for your reply to my compositing question, but how do you window in to a smaller part of the screen without making everything look totally pixellated ?
Sorry if this sounds like a silly question, but I'm a complete novice at this.

Thanks, Tony Powell
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets