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Airport Scanners vs Kodak Vision 500T


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#1 Pawel Saladziak

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 12:47 PM

Hi.

I have a problem.

I bought Kodak Visiont 500T and 100T film. They are unexposed.

Stocks are in London now, and I'm in Poland. ;-)

My friend can take them, while traveling by plane, by on the Kodak website they say that scanners on airport will damage the negatives. I called the Stansted Airport helpdesk, and the lady told me that unexposed films that are less sensitive that 3000 will not be destroyed on the security point where they check the hand luggage.

Can anyone share some opinion on dealing with such a situation and problem?

regards
pawel
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 01:06 PM

Hi,

I wouldn't.

Advice given by the security people is suspect for several reasons:

- They're just parroting the brochures from the manufacturers of the scanning equipment, who obviously have a massive interest in making their products seem as benign as possible. Conversely:

- Kodak's advice has long been to not scan any motion picture film whatsoever, for exactly these reasons. Their vested interests are in exactly the opposite direction.

- They're talking about stills film, where variations in exposure (flashing by the X-ray machine) is not very visible between frames. We're talking about motion picture films, where playing the whole reel back in sequence at 24fps can make variations in exposure extremely obvious.

- Their advice is inconsistent. Heathrow uses some of the exact same make and model of scanners that LAX does. LAX claims that all film is safe (which is definitely not true). Heathrow used to claim that anything up to 800ASA was safe, now they claim 1000. This advice is clearly not based on actual technical facts - just politics.

- The airport security people have no reason to care whether they ruin your film. There is no comeback against them; you'd be extremely hard put to sue them for the cost of reshooting valuable material. They know this, and they simply do not care.

I would not be railing against airport security people in such vehement terms if I hadn't on several occasions found them to be inconsistent, technically inept, self-contradictory, and poorly informed even of their own rules - certainly the TSA at McCarran in Las Vegas do not know that they are legally obliged to offer hand inspection. The rules are no protection here - you may expect any sort of treatment wherever you go, and you are often in a very poor position to argue.

Phil
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#3 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 09:11 PM

The film will be completely ruined- do not do it! For still films, there is far more tolerance. Motion picture films will be rendered useless.
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#4 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 11:45 AM

Hi.

I have a problem.

I bought Kodak Visiont 500T and 100T film. They are unexposed.

Stocks are in London now, and I'm in Poland. ;-)

My friend can take them, while traveling by plane, by on the Kodak website they say that scanners on airport will damage the negatives. I called the Stansted Airport helpdesk, and the lady told me that unexposed films that are less sensitive that 3000 will not be destroyed on the security point where they check the hand luggage.

Can anyone share some opinion on dealing with such a situation and problem?

regards
pawel



normaly hand-luggage scanners are ok, but I wouldn't try if you can avoid. I would carry a changing-bag with and let the security people touch the film. They have snoopers to detect explosivs they don't X-ray they're completly safe for film, that's what they did when the last time I had some film on me.

The checkin-luggage scanners usually fog everything, even low asa stocks...

why don't son't you send the stuff by mail?
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 02:42 PM

Definitely do NOT send the film as CHECKED baggage -- it almost certainly will be severely fogged by the powerful scanning type x-ray machines used for checked baggage. Any baggage or package put in the belly of a PASSENGER plane could be x-rayed, no matter how it is labeled or shipped, and this includes the airline "will call" package services.

Even the lower power CARRY-ON baggage inspection machines may cause some fogging, especially with higher speed films and multiple passes. As Phil notes, any fog on a motion picture film is more visible "in motion". Most countries (e.g., USA TSA guidelines) will allow a hand inspection if you provide the changing bag, and there is time for the security personnel to properly feel inside each can.

Most of the commercial air shipping companies (e.g., DHL, FedEx, UPS) have procedures to label and manifest unprocessed film to avoid X-ray inspection, and use other inspection techniques.
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#6 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 04:27 PM

I'd recommend you just ship the film to yourself through FedEx with the "do not X-ray" label on the package.

That, or you can find a lead box with at least 3 inches of thickness, place your films inside and weld it shut. That way the x-rays won't harm your film. ;)

But seriously, there WILL be damage if you take your film through any airport x-ray. Take the necessary precautions.
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#7 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 07:58 PM

That, or you can find a lead box with at least 3 inches of thickness, place your films inside and weld it shut. That way the x-rays won't harm your film. ;)


They would either send the package to the bomb squad to Blow it up, or crank the scanner up to max, and then refuse the shipment.

I would try the FED-EX, manifested as Film, show up at the fed-ex depot to show them it really is film, and have them follow their "Motion Picture Studio Film" procedures.

have whoever is packing it up pastes lot sof coppies of Kodak's DO nOT X-ray" stickers on it as well as the "PHOTO" stickers they use in Europe. (or do they say "FOTO" )
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#8 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 14 November 2006 - 10:07 AM

That, or you can find a lead box with at least 3 inches of thickness, place your films inside and weld it shut.


Once I had lead acid batteries in my hand-luagage, they couldn't see anything on the x-ray, so they checked it with the explosiv-snooper
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