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Violin commercial


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#1 Justin Hayward

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 02:25 PM

Hi,

A spot I shot recently popped up on this website...

http://www.bestadson...ils.php?id=3930

...so I thought I'd put it on here as I feel it turned out quite nice.

We shot 5279 on an Arri 3 with Ziess T1.3 superspeeds (18, 35, 65, and an 85mm). I chose the lens due to the backgrounds. I lit everything down to a T1.3 in order to get nice exposures of the city.

Justin

Edited by Justin Hayward, 13 November 2006 - 02:28 PM.

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#2 Felipe Perez-Burchard

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 03:56 PM

Really nice work...

What did you use as the main key on the lady... beautiful big and soft, complements her very well ;

thanks for posting it.

:)

-felipe.
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#3 Stephen Murphy

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 04:53 PM

Really nice Justin. 79 is such a great stock. Did you replace the practicals at the loaction or leave them as is?
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#4 Justin Hayward

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Posted 13 November 2006 - 09:00 PM

Thanks guys.

She was lit with kinos gelled with 216 and different ND usually just out of frame. It was very dim. Most of the lighting was simply turning off or flagging off practicals. I found there was light coming from everywhere, so a lot of the time she was just surrounded with 4x floppy?s.

Before I was hired, the producers assumed they would have to change out the bulbs in the practicals, but they soon found out it wasn?t going to be cheap. The city wouldn?t just let us do it ourselves, so they offered to send out some guys, but apparently they wanted a lot of money. After visiting the location I decided changing the bulbs wouldn?t be necessary as I was getting exactly a T1.4 at 24fps . I knew we wouldn?t be over-cranking anything and I knew I would be exposing everything at a T1.3 already, so I told them it would be fine. The color all matched pretty well, but I had previously talked to the director about letting the color shift a little under each light anyway as it would help everything look a little more grungy. The producers were very happy with me.
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#5 Albert Smith

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Posted 14 November 2006 - 12:18 AM

Looked great, suprised praticals would do so much for you in that scene...outside at a trainsation, but it looked wonderful. Its great to see chicago to, I must have passed by that trainstation a thousand times, thats one of the ones on 90/94 right? haha. Chicago is great. I think this is also a tribute to the fact that with the newer filmstocks and fast lenses video isnt not neccessarly any stronger in low light situations.
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#6 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 06:24 AM

Wow, this looks really gorgeous. I especially love the slow push in on the woman with the train passing in the foreground. Were those dolly shots difficult to get?

Also, are those clouds in the extreme long shot over the titles real, or was the sky added in post?
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#7 Justin Hayward

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 09:48 AM

The clouds were added in post.

The dolly in on the woman through the train was impossible for us to do in one shot. We would have had to be on the street with a jib or a crane or something, but we didn?t have the street. So, we shot the train passing from the platform, flopped the film, and pulled a luminance key of the dolly in on her, so it?s actually two shots. We just had to make sure there was no writing on the train or it would have appeared backwards.

I started the dolly with her out of focus, and then pulled her in hoping they would use the bit with her out of focus and then pulling her in focus just as the train passed, to look like we were pulling focus from the train to her. I figured it might sell the shot a little better as we were shooting such a shallow depth of field on everything else, but they wound up using the second half of the dolly shot with her in focus the whole time.
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#8 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 02:02 AM

Cool, thanks for the details. The comp shot looks very real. Did you keep the same lens on for the two composite elements, or was that not an issue?
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#9 Justin Hayward

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 04:55 PM

Yeah, I used the 35mm on both.
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#10 Wendell_Greene

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 05:21 PM

Nice work, Justin!
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#11 Jim Feldspar

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 10:27 AM

Nice work, Justin!



It sure looks great. Interesting directorial choices, for example her rubbing her nose is very real for
somebody who's reading a fashion magazine and probably wouldn't be so unglamorous if other people
there. Also, what's up with the guy sitting down at the end? She seems to roll her eyes. Is he the symbol
of the real world - the regular dull guy - who's probably going to hit on her and is taking her out of her
fantasy reverie of the violin music and therefore the romance of the film festival?

Love the opening shot, among many others. There are some colored lights up high -practicals? Did you
put them there?
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#12 Justin Hayward

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 01:49 AM

There are some colored lights up high -practicals? Did you
put them there?


No.
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#13 sibte hassan

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 02:15 AM

Hey Justin
my question might sound stupid but how did you manage the colors of the lights in the background merge with the key?
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#14 Justin Hayward

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 11:58 AM

I let everything outside the platform be what it is, but I used cool white bulbs in the kinos to match the florescent practicals. The color was close, although I think my gaffer added 1/8 +green as well.
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#15 Joey Dee

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 11:11 AM

Also, what's up with the guy sitting down at the end? She seems to roll her eyes. Is he the symbol
of the real world - the regular dull guy - who's probably going to hit on her and is taking her out of her
fantasy reverie of the violin music and therefore the romance of the film festival?

Hey Jim,

If you notice the woman gets annoyed by the violinist right, so she looks @ him and he stops, bascially the violin symbolizes pretty much "European Cinema" as it has alot of mellow-drama and so forth (which was a excellent choice of musical instrument for this clip as it was promoting foreign films @ the Chicago film fest). So finaly @ the last shot an old man comes to sit beside her and the violin comes back to reiterate that "Europeaness or Foreigness to the scene" and she gets annoyed only by the violinist and not the old man.

Overall - well done clip, love the shots & the concept and I wish Justin the best.

My best,
Joey Dee

Edited by Joey Dee, 16 December 2006 - 11:12 AM.

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Tai Audio

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Aerial Filmworks

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Glidecam

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Visual Products

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera