Jump to content


Photo

Chocolate


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Ken Minehan

Ken Minehan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 168 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Singapore

Posted 16 November 2006 - 10:59 PM

Hello Guys,
Recently there was an American film crew in Singapore shooting a feature film "Singapore Dreaming". The DOP was Martina Radwan. I was not on the shoot, but my friends were as grips and lighting crew. They were telling me about lighting night scenes and using a gel called "chocolate". This is something i've never heard of and i assume rarely used in Singapore.

What exactly is this and how is it used?

Thanks
Ken Minehan
  • 0

#2 Jon Rosenbloom

Jon Rosenbloom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 713 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:26 AM

It's really, really, really warm ... I think of it more for summer daylight through brown pollution haze than for nights ...
  • 0

#3 Michael LaVoie

Michael LaVoie
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 719 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:42 AM

Last time I remember reading about anyone using chocolate gels it was on Lost Highway. A.C. did an article on the film. Might have some useful tips.
  • 0

#4 J. Lamar King

J. Lamar King
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 764 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 17 November 2006 - 12:55 PM

Like previously stated Chocolate lighting gell is really warm. Sometimes it's used to mimick dirty looking street lights or just because the DP likes the warm color. It's more yellowy warm than orangey warm if that makes sense.
  • 0

#5 Laurent Andrieux

Laurent Andrieux
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1527 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • France

Posted 17 November 2006 - 02:46 PM

May be was it for a night street scene and the gel used to make some sodium effect or some sort of street lamp.
  • 0

#6 Frank Barrera

Frank Barrera
  • Sustaining Members
  • 464 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 17 November 2006 - 08:08 PM

I have used Chocolate Rosco #99 to enhance the skin tones of dark skin actors. Mostly for actresses with brown skin. It has a somewhat glamorous feel to it bringing out a goldish glow to the skin. I have tried it on lighter skin toned caucasian subjects and though it looks good I don't think it looks all that different than a CTO. Whereas 1/4 or 1/2 CTO on brown skin doesn't have the desired effect. I shot a short once with a south american boy with indigenous blood. His skin was already a nice golden brown and the Chocolate really made him glow. It enhanced his already sympathetic look. This effect was perfect for the story.

I have never used it out side but would imagine that it would make any brownish elements in the scene have a warmish gold glow.

F
  • 0

#7 Daniel Carruthers

Daniel Carruthers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 334 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Canada

Posted 18 November 2006 - 01:24 PM

Last time I remember reading about anyone using chocolate gels it was on Lost Highway. A.C. did an article on the film. Might have some useful tips.


peter deming seems to use alot of chocolate filters. he also used them in From Hell, i think the ac also did an artical on that film as well.
Mullholand Drive might of had some chocolate filters too.
  • 0


Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Visual Products

Tai Audio

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

Opal

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Abel Cine

The Slider

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products