Jump to content


Photo

USC


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Jamie McIntyre

Jamie McIntyre
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 212 posts
  • Student
  • Los Angeles / Reading, UK

Posted 17 November 2006 - 02:56 AM

hey guys,

Im in the process of applying for the USC Cinema school.

I have spoken to various people about how hard it is to get accepted there. And apparently it's quite hard, but still the fact of 'money talks' still remains.

Would the fact that me being from England having full support give me a slight advantage?


Thanks,

Jamie
  • 0

#2 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:23 AM

hey guys,

Im in the process of applying for the USC Cinema school.

I have spoken to various people about how hard it is to get accepted there. And apparently it's quite hard, but still the fact of 'money talks' still remains.

Would the fact that me being from England having full support give me a slight advantage?
Thanks,

Jamie

I suppose you'll find out once your application is processed.
  • 0

#3 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:45 AM

Why would applying to one of America's most prestigous private schools as a foreigner be an advantage?

Do you think Oxford and Cambridge go out of their way to welcome Americans?

It costs 250K as a US student to graduate from USC, I'm sure they'll charge a foreign student a lot more. I assume you come from a very wealthy family?

R,
  • 0

#4 Arni Heimir

Arni Heimir
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 326 posts
  • Other
  • Reykjavik/Barcelona

Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:59 AM

hey guys,

Im in the process of applying for the USC Cinema school.

I have spoken to various people about how hard it is to get accepted there. And apparently it's quite hard, but still the fact of 'money talks' still remains.

Would the fact that me being from England having full support give me a slight advantage?
Thanks,

Jamie


Admission boards tend to want a broad range of students in their programmes.

To be honest, is it wise to spend the 250k or so in an education which you leave you with limited oppertunities in an already saturated industry? I think you should take an liberal arts degree and see if you want to pursue a MFA in film production.

If you want to be enrolled in USC then I wish you the best of luck.
  • 0

#5 Kirk Anderson

Kirk Anderson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 220 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 November 2006 - 12:22 PM

I worked my ass off in high school and went to town on my SAT's and I got into USC's cinema school. Being out of state from Colorado it was even more difficult, but after being told it would be around 40k a year I had to decline the offer. In my interview process I noticed three denver broncos and their sons, as well as prodominate figures in the Denver Scene. Yes, I'm a smidge bitter, but all in all it would have been the wrong choice for me. After feeling out the vibe and meeting with advisors I believe, IMHO, that money definately talks at USC. If you got the cash, you don't need the scores. They talked about tuition way more than their programs. I'm not trying to upset anyone or trash talk. this was just my opinion of my own situation.
  • 0

#6 Douglas Hunter

Douglas Hunter
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:20 PM

After feeling out the vibe and meeting with advisors I believe, IMHO, that money definately talks at USC. If you got the cash, you don't need the scores.



I think the people I know who teach at USC and are on the admission comittiee for the graduate program would be offended by this and other statements made here about the power of money at USC. They take the job of screening applicants very seriously and put a lot of effort into it. If the process lacks integreity as you suggest I don't think these folks would spend 5 minutes of their valuable time on screening applicants, it wouldn't be worth it to them.

As a USC grad, I can tell you that there was, and still is a good deal of economic diversity in the program. Are there well connected welathy students at USC? Yes, but USC is one of the few schools those folks apply to, some of them are going to get in. I think this focus on money is something that folks on the outside concentrate on. When you are in the program who has money and connections does not matter that much, meeting deadlines and doing the work is what matters.
  • 0

#7 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 17 November 2006 - 04:09 PM

Well come on Douglas USC and the other private elite schools across the USA are not so idealistic as to say, "gee this kid has talent, but he comes from a dirt poor family, let's admit him any way."

Can we get real here, schools like USC are not for America's middle class families, they are for the top 1-2% elite of society. Saying, "we had this one guy who was not well connected...." that just doesn't reflect the reality of the student body at large at these schools. Sure Harvard has the token "poor kid" but come on.

R,
  • 0

#8 Douglas Hunter

Douglas Hunter
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Other
  • Los Angeles

Posted 17 November 2006 - 06:33 PM

Richard,

It sound like you've got your mind made up about the place, think what ever you like I suppose. But know that you discredit myself and many other students who attend the USC film program. In my class there were more working class students from Korea than there were rich hollywood insiders.

But I'm sure you have much more first hand experience with USC than I do, that you've had far more informed converstaions with faculty and staff than I have and so clearly, you're understanding of the school, the application process and who gets in is nothing short of comprehensive.

If the USC film program was only for the offspring of the rich, hollywood establishment there simply would be no USC flim program.
  • 0

#9 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 17 November 2006 - 09:11 PM

I think you misunderstand. My point is that the Ivy League is not in general for the middle class.

I don't think there is any data to dispute that.

As for...

"But I'm sure you have much more first hand experience with USC than I do, that you've had far more informed converstaions with faculty and staff than I have and so clearly, you're understanding of the school, the application process and who gets in is nothing short of comprehensive."

Hmmmm, I didn't attend the Ivy League but I'd say this is sarcasm?

R,
  • 0

#10 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 17 November 2006 - 09:42 PM

One of my daughters graduated Summa from Brown (Marine Biology). The other graduated this year from William and Mary, one of the State Ivy's (Double major, Graphic Arts and Anthropology). I can assure you neither came from a family in the upper 2% of American wealth. I can also assure you that both are very smart, very social, and damn hard workers. I attribute those virtues to their mothers.
  • 0

#11 Richard Boddington

Richard Boddington
  • Sustaining Members
  • 5482 posts
  • Director

Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:35 PM

I stand corrected....let those middle class applications roll into Harvard and Stanford then.

Things must have changed in America in the last 48 hours.

R,
  • 0

#12 Hal Smith

Hal Smith
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2280 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • OKC area

Posted 18 November 2006 - 12:15 AM

I stand corrected....let those middle class applications roll into Harvard and Stanford then.

The trick is to make certain your kids get a darn good secondary education.

High grades, class participation, good SAT's, etc. are what gets a middle class kid into those schools. I admit my ex's and I cheated. The older daughter went to Cate School in Santa Barbara where she lived at the time. Being a day student saved about $10,000/year in school expense. The other's mom married the headmaster of a good private elementary school in Weems, VA. He then got himself a faculty job at reasonably nearby ChristChurch School (a topflight Episcopal Church connected school) when it came time for the younger daughter to go on to high school. He had a daughter of his own about two years younger than mine so that paid off twice for him since she also qualified for entry at ChristChurch.

Probably the best strategy is to arrange to live in a locality where there is a top-flight private school or two. Expensive secondary schools do get quite a bit cheaper for day students. I live in rural Logan County in an area where kids go the the Edmond, OK public schools, which is one of the top two or three public systems in OK. That's another good school gambit. My neighbor's kids are getting a very good public education but are living in a semi-rural area with much cheaper living expenses than expensive yuppy Edmond.
  • 0

#13 Gavin Greenwalt

Gavin Greenwalt
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 225 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 November 2006 - 12:34 AM

In my class there were more working class students from Korea than there were rich hollywood insiders.


Based on discussions with some of my friends attending USC. The key phrase there was "From Korea". USC has a very well established international quota policy in place. Something that I don't disagree with. Having attended a school without any sort of policy to seek diversity in its students I can attest it definitely hurts the education to some degree. Would I be angry if I wasn't accepted because a student with a lower academic record was accepted? Absolutely, but I also understand where the school is coming from and it's an unfortunate reality that there are only so many openings.

So in response to the original post: yes it can help to be applying from a foreign country, but expect a very large mark up for not being a resident.
  • 0


Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

CineTape

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC