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How Do I Shoot An LCD Screen?


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#1 DorSinai

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 04:27 AM

Hey

I will shoot a short flick in Super 16 and i have a scene with a computer screen. i have consulted with several people. Some told me about a device called the "Phase-Shifter" but the really know-how's told me that if its LCD above 4ms (milli-seconds) then i dont need a phase shifter or anything.

The screen is LENOVO L171 (LCD) 15". it says in the specification that the screen is 8ms.

Im shooting at Super 16 and the screen has a lot of screen time.

Thanx!
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#2 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 08:46 AM

I don't know about the phaseshifting issue. Another thing ist the colortemperatur of your screen, they can get very blue. I'd shoot some tests with different Kelvinsettings on the screen and maybe a 85 filter...
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#3 Rob Featherstone

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:56 AM

An LCD screen shouldn't have any phase issues.

It's been while but I am pretty sure you can just film it without worry.

You can run the camera without film in it and see the results in the viewfinder!

-Rob Featherstone
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:13 PM

Yeah, we're seeing a lot of films now that are using LCD's and plasmas for shooting televisions nowadays. Mostly for product placement, but I imagine it's easier too with the non-phasing issues.

Regarding the color temperature, Bernhard's right. You should watch the new NBC show "30 Rock". I saw it for the first time last night, and every shot of an LCD television was VERY blue, so they're probably daylight balanced.
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#5 Thanasis Diamantopoulos

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 01:19 PM

Hey

I will shoot a short flick in Super 16 and i have a scene with a computer screen. i have consulted with several people. Some told me about a device called the "Phase-Shifter" but the really know-how's told me that if its LCD above 4ms (milli-seconds) then i dont need a phase shifter or anything.

The screen is LENOVO L171 (LCD) 15". it says in the specification that the screen is 8ms.

Im shooting at Super 16 and the screen has a lot of screen time.

Thanx!

Hi
There is no problem with the phase of your screen just get in menu of the screen and fix the colors a litle wormer if you are using tungsten film. if you are shooting full frame of the screen you can fix the litle diference on cc. If your scrren is just plays in scene the is no problem of the little color diferense. BYT if your are going for blowing up full frame lcd screen try to get a screen with the less grain in the market.
cheep screens blurs the image. USE LC3 filter for lower contrast.
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#6 DorSinai

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 06:57 AM

a big thank you for all those who answered.
I will shoot with a daylight film and the screen will have a lot of full frame screen time.
I must say i didnt quite get what thanasis diamantopoulos has said. im a beginner guys.
Will i be in need of an 85 filter? if its daylight and i can change the screen colors in the screen itself am i all set to go?
:) this Cinematography.com business Rocks.
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#7 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 08:26 AM

Will i be in need of an 85 filter? if its daylight and i can change the screen colors in the screen itself am i all set to go?

No need for 85 on daylight stock, but check your monitor or graphic-card settings, on a mac you can choose colortemperatur in the monitor-menu, it goes from 4500K to 9000K, factory setting is 6507K, not sure if it's accurate...I guess each screen is a little different
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#8 DorSinai

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 11:22 AM

No need for 85 on daylight stock, but check your monitor or graphic-card settings, on a mac you can choose colortemperatur in the monitor-menu, it goes from 4500K to 9000K, factory setting is 6507K, not sure if it's accurate...I guess each screen is a little different



What is the best K to shoot with? will i know by looking through the viewfinder? or should i just fix it beforehand?
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#9 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 07:35 PM

What is the best K to shoot with? will i know by looking through the viewfinder? or should i just fix it beforehand?


You won't be able to see accuracy of color temperature by eye (or the viewfinder). Film is more sensitive to differences in color temperature than your eye.

When using daylight balanced filmstock, a color temperature closest to 5600K will be close to correct. You can use a digital still camera or video camera to look at the screen's color compared to the surroundings as a guide to color balancing the screen (set your digital camera to daylight WB, not "auto").
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#10 Michael Rizzi

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 08:03 PM

Also, don't forget to spot meter the screen and adjust the brightness according to the stop you will be shooting at. Your eyes compensate a lot better than film does.
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#11 Gavin Greenwalt

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Posted 19 November 2006 - 05:10 AM

Find a high end review of the monitor you want to use. A good review will actually tell you where the white point is. Just because your Video card says "5200" doesn't mean that's what the monitor is reproducing.

Edited by Gavin Greenwalt, 19 November 2006 - 05:11 AM.

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#12 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 08:17 PM

If you're shooting NTSC 24FPS(60Hz), I dont believe you'll have problems if the monitor's refresh rate is also at 60Hz. If you're shooting PAL 25FPS(50Hz) then you should set your monitor accordingly as well. You can also play with shutter angle (provided your camera have variable shutter). When I was shooting a TV screen we used an Arri SR3 and changed the shutter angle to 172.8degrees.
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#13 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 09:43 PM

If you're shooting NTSC 24FPS(60Hz), I dont believe you'll have problems if the monitor's refresh rate is also at 60Hz. If you're shooting PAL 25FPS(50Hz) then you should set your monitor accordingly as well. You can also play with shutter angle (provided your camera have variable shutter). When I was shooting a TV screen we used an Arri SR3 and changed the shutter angle to 172.8degrees.


You're thinking of a CRT screen, or maybe a Plasma. Most LCD's have a long enough decay rate and a high enough refresh rate that generally you don't have to adjust frame rate or shutter speed to shoot them, you can just use the standard 24 fps / 180 degree shutter.
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