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4:3 in HD


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#1 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 10:47 PM

Hey,

I've got a project coming up and they want to shoot 720 24PA - I know this camera pretty well, but I've never been asked to shoot with those specs in 4:3. I've shot to tape 4:3 just fine, but is it possible with the specs above to shoot native 4:3 since it's meant for TV?

Thanks,
Chris
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#2 Guy Jackson

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 11:23 PM

Christopher
This is one of the most depressing stages about the slow transition to HD, since not all viewers have wide 16:9 HD screens, we have to sacrifice and compromise our composition.
On your side just set your safety lines to 4:3 which is your ?TV? safe frame, but never forget to make sure that all that area in your viewfinder is on film in case they change their mind later(don?t think of the area beyond as dead) .
The 4:3 is done in post so just concentrated on that middle frame and shoot ?for TV?
Guy
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#3 Michael Schrengohst

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 11:32 AM

And you can always provide a "letterbox" 4:3 version....
I just did a DVD that has a 16:9 version and a 4:3 version....
Once they see how much cooler the 16:9 is they will
run out to best buy and plunk down $3500 for a new 50" Plasma....
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#4 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 06:33 PM

I've got a project coming up and they want to shoot 720 24PA - I know this camera pretty well, but I've never been asked to shoot with those specs in 4:3. I've shot to tape 4:3 just fine, but is it possible with the specs above to shoot native 4:3 since it's meant for TV?


According to the manual, the camera will record a 4:3 image in 480i only -- not when using 720P or 1080i. When using 720 you'll need to frame for 4:3 and make sure the image gets posted correctly.
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#5 Michael Schrengohst

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 11:23 AM

Plus if it is for TV why not just shoot 480i 30p???
For spots I shoot DVCPRO 50 480i 30p......
I shoot progressive because all the material gets
reused for DVD and web.....
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#6 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 11:53 AM

Thanks for the input guys, I really appreciate it. I have to shoot 720P since they've already shot stuff that's 720.

As for shooting 16:9 (since the camera won't shoot native 4:3 in 720Pmode) while composing for 4:3, how do we post later and fix the aspect ratio? Are we in essence blowing up the image to fill a 4:3?

Mr. Nash, I'm sure you might know the answer to this one.

Best,
Chris
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#7 David Cox

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 12:11 PM

Hi,

The reason you can't shoot a native 720P 4:3 is that this format doesn't exist - all HD formats are 16:9

If you shoot 720P, then in post you will take the middle 75% of the picture (although you could pan and scan). In terms of resolution, your original image is 1280 x 720. The actual pixels that you will be using will be 75% of this so 960 x 720 - still more than shooting SD.

For framing, if you don't have any form of guide then hook up a widescreen monitor, stick some card over 12.5% of its width on the left side and 12.5% of its width on the right side and thats your frame!

You would still be wise to shoot the full 16:9 frame but with your action safely inside the 4:3 area, as this also gives you the choice of using the widescreen material if you need to in the future.

David Cox
Baraka Post Production
www.baraka.co.uk
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#8 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 03:56 PM

That makes total sense. I guess my question is that when I import into FCP for instance and I have a 16:9 picture, how do I tell is to select the 4:3 picture?

I'm more curious as to how post intensive shooting like this will be...not that I have a choice :(

Best,
Chris
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#9 Phil Connolly

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 06:13 PM

In FCP have your sequence set to 4:3 and the clips to 16:9. When you drag your clips onto the timeline it should automatically presever the correct geometry and create a 16:9 letterboxed image within a 4:3 frame.

You now just need to resize this letterboxed image so that the top of the image touches the top of the 4:3 frame and the edges are cropped.

Another method would be to produce a 16:9 master, with 4:3 safe text and use a hardware aspect ratio converter to produce a 4:3 master. Many post houses have this sort of kit and can do the job in real time as a tape to tape process.
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#10 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 10:42 PM

Thanks Phil!!
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