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#1 Jay Taylor

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 12:06 AM

Alright, I tried searching for info on this, but didn't seem to find a definitive answer. But maybe one doesn't exist.

With 16/s16mm, can you achieve shallow dof? If so, HOW shallow? And how would you do it?

I understand how focal length, and t-stops affect dof. And how the image format apparently affects it as well. So maybe rather then discuss all the technicalities of this, would some example video/stills be possible?

Are there any examples out there of successful shallow dof with 16/s16mm?

Jay
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#2 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 12:14 AM

Alright, I tried searching for info on this, but didn't seem to find a definitive answer. But maybe one doesn't exist.

With 16/s16mm, can you achieve shallow dof? If so, HOW shallow? And how would you do it?

I understand how focal length, and t-stops affect dof. And how the image format apparently affects it as well. So maybe rather then discuss all the technicalities of this, would some example video/stills be possible?

Are there any examples out there of successful shallow dof with 16/s16mm?

Jay


I don't know what stills I could use, but for the same stop, and field of view, because of the smaller negative of 16mm, it will always have more dof than 35mm. NDing the lens will allow you to open up more, but other than changing the shutter angle, which is probably not something you want to do to reduce dof, you can either go to longer lenses or embrace the increased dof of the format.
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 02:26 AM

because of the smaller negative of 16mm, it will always have more dof than 35mm.


That doesn't sound right...I'm pretty sure the bigger the frame or format the more DoF you have. But yeah, with 16 you can still achieve a shallow DoF, as you can with any format. It depends of course on your focal length and f-stop, as you know.

Consult the charts at the back of the ASC book.
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#4 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 03:30 AM

Camera's wont get you much difference in result. Film speed, F stop (t stop) and lens speed will. Also whether or not you're in telephoto.
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#5 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 06:38 AM

I second Jonathan. The smaller the image, the less dof all paremeters equals besides.

But the smaller the image is, the shorter your focal length has to be, as to achieve a precise shot, considering its field of view.

Therefore, a considered shot, with a given field of view, will have more dof in 16 than a lerger format (35 mm), at a given f-stop.

This more like a newbie question, to me BTW. Pity you didn't post in the dedicated section...
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#6 Mike Panczenko

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 07:52 AM

I second Jonathan. The smaller the image, the less dof all paremeters equals besides.

But the smaller the image is, the shorter your focal length has to be, as to achieve a precise shot, considering its field of view.

Therefore, a considered shot, with a given field of view, will have more dof in 16 than a lerger format (35 mm), at a given f-stop.

This more like a newbie question, to me BTW. Pity you didn't post in the dedicated section...



Yeah, sorry for the lack of clarification- I meant for the same field of view, the dof of 16mm will always be greater- ie, using a 24mm where you would use a 12mm in 35mm.
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#7 Michael Nash

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 07:45 PM

With 16/s16mm, can you achieve shallow dof? If so, HOW shallow? And how would you do it?

I understand how focal length, and t-stops affect dof. And how the image format apparently affects it as well. So maybe rather then discuss all the technicalities of this, would some example video/stills be possible?


Well, if you understand how focal length, t-stop, format, (and distance to subject) affect depth of field, then you already have your answer. The shallowest dof comes from the widest aperture, the longest focal length, and the smallest distance to subject.

There are depth of field charts that will show you the specific depth of field (expressed in distance from the film plane) for different lens/aperture/distance combinations.
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#8 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 09:49 PM

Use an ND filter as well.
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