Jump to content


Photo

Rotoscoping


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 19 November 2006 - 08:08 PM

How exactly is Rotoscoping done and what is (equpiment ect) involved in creating it? What are it's limitations?

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 19 November 2006 - 08:09 PM.

  • 0

#2 Alessandro Malfatti

Alessandro Malfatti
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 149 posts
  • Other
  • Barcelona, Spain

Posted 19 November 2006 - 08:51 PM

Well, as far as I know, rotoscoping was (is?) done by rear projecting an image onto a screen, putting paper or something on it and tracing the projected image onto the paper, was done at one time to have a cartoon character fight a real cat. That's the old way, nowadays it's done by computer somehow...
  • 0

#3 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 19 November 2006 - 09:10 PM

:huh: :blink:
  • 0

#4 Will Earl

Will Earl
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • Other
  • Wellington, NZ

Posted 19 November 2006 - 10:16 PM

How exactly is Rotoscoping done and what is (equpiment ect) involved in creating it? What are it's limitations?


Rotoscoping is animation using filmed footage as a reference. It can be used to create travelling mattes for compositing and colour grading or to match animated characters to human performance.

Pre-digital, rotoscoping was drawn frame-by-frame by projecting the image and drawing over the projected image.

Now most (if not all) rotoscoping is done using the computer.
  • 0

#5 Xavier Plaza

Xavier Plaza
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 288 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Guayaquil - Ecuador

Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:02 AM

Hi, i was dping in a small project last year, we make a commercial in a small white studio, the project was a two dancers moving and dancing. We shot the dancers an then the post house use the technic "rotoscopy" in adobe illustrator and animated in adobe after effect.
The video was shot in 30 frames per second but the post house use only 15 frames per seconds. i use a panasonic dvx100a, 2 mini brutus (4K each) on the top with a big overhead silk, 4 2K open face bounced for fill light, and 2 5k. I recommended in my experience shot at 250 shutter speed or more, because when you use (in post) each frame, the frames shot at that shutter are better to use because the borders are clear and the person who draw in ilustrator or other programs don't have problems when people move, here attach few productios photos, hope helps



Xavier Plaza
Director of Photography

Attached Images

  • picture1.jpg
  • picture1a.jpg
  • Picture_3.jpg
  • Picture_5.jpg
  • Picture_6.jpg

  • 0

#6 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20071 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:51 AM

Generally "rotoscoping" means manually (whether by a hand tracing a projected frame or on a computer) drawing an outline around an object in a frame, frame-by-frame, usually for the purpose of creating a travelling matte around part or all of the object. Usually done when some matting system like chromakey was not used, or the chromakey needs fixing or cleaning up along some edges.
  • 0

#7 Jan Kielland

Jan Kielland
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 November 2006 - 07:52 AM

I'm currently animating masks in after effects. I'm not usually going frame by frame but you can if you want to.
Silhouette FX have a plug in that called Silhouette Roto that might make it easier. I never tried it.

Jan Kielland
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

The Slider

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery