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Film stock in the fridge, in the MAG - how long is too long?


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#1 Lav Bodnaruk

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 12:28 AM

Hey guys,

been flat out working on my indi feature film http://www.translationthemovie.com, from shooting that preview to making that web site, so much so that I haven't used my 16mm stuff in almot a year.

Now, there is this festival I awlays wanted to do a short for, and its on now... so I thouht why not? I got a great story...

Here is the prob. Somewhat a year ago (just under) I shot 50" of one 500T roll and left it Unexposed in the mag. We are talking about 16mm BL mag here, taped up with a ton of gaff. Its sitting at the bottom of the fridge, fruit & vege basket, at the even 13degrees (i think). With it is ANOTHER Mag (I know this is insane) with 310" of 500T.

I also got 400" of 'uneven' 250D, which was dismissed by a production house and given to me. I figure 'uneven' means it was shaken a bit in transport (I re-call it was send to Oz from Canada and quite few rolls they dissmises as 'uneven').

Thats what I got.
Oh and I got a video camera too... but like I said, I'd rather shoot this short on film.

What do you think? Is this film going to be OK? I know I should be able to keep it in the fridge for a year if in a CAN (like the 250D) but what about the stuff that I (an idiot) left in the MAG? What effect could come from it? MAGs are nice and dry... no condesation on them at all (just checked).

well, hit me back with any thoughts...

PS. the short is set in the backyard, same as the scene from my 35mm feature preview - on the Translation site.... same yard, same table...
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#2 Tim Carroll

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 12:44 AM

Lav,

My concern would be moisture and condensation.

I'm a tad anal and always store my film in the original sealed containers, inside "vacuum packed" zip lock bags (zip lock bags with all the air sucked out) in the refrigerator (or freezer if for a longer period of time).

When I want to use a roll, I take it out of the cold and let it come to room temperature before I open the zip lock bag, to prevent any condensation from accumulating on the film. I would worry that when you take those mags out of the fridge, you are going to be getting condensation on the cold film right away.

-Tim
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#3 Lav Bodnaruk

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 12:56 AM

hey Tim,
I think you may be right with what you said. I also think that I am a nob for leaving them in the MAGs, especially since I have number of those vacum bags and empty cans floating around...

I guess I am wondering what effect might condesation have on the film itself?

Also, regarding that 'uneven' stock, is it best to try and correct the 'uneven' bit with hands whilst loading, or would anyone recommend slaming the can (before opening) onto the flat surface so that it flateness? Does that make sense? I am sort of scared of the later option and might try and feel with my hands how 'uneven' it is...
I think slaming it might cause issues but maybe soft taps wouldnt?

Dam, i just dont have cash to buy another 2 rolls for this short on top of other costs.... hence why i wodner what condesation does to the look of the film, in case i still decide to shoot with it over video.

Oh and is there a way of taking it out of the fridge, moving to say an eski with just a bit warmer atmos, then out... so it slows the process down... to avoide that condesation? any tips?

thanks tim!
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#4 Zachary Vex

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 01:29 AM

When you take it out of the fridge, quickly put it in a large plastic bag, suck the air out, and seal it up. that should help keep moisture from condensing on the magazine. a garbage bag will do if you and you can seal it by twisting up the opening and wrapping it tight with a rubber band. Don't take it out after you've been cooking or using the dishwasher (or dishpan), or taking a shower, as the humidity will be very high. If it's cold outside, you might want to open a door or some windows to let in cold outside air which will be drier than that inside your house.
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#5 Lav Bodnaruk

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 02:56 AM

thats a great tip Vex (got a friend that is called Vex too... his nick name actually). I am shooting early December, so I'll attempt this bag removal couple of days before, in case it doesn't work out. Fingers crossed though :)

Cheers,
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#6 Dominic Case

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:00 PM

would anyone recommend slaming the can (before opening) onto the flat surface so that it flateness? Does that make sense?

:o PLEASE tell me you are joking.

Forcing winds back into line like this will cause abrasions and pressure fog on raw stock. That's if they haven't happened already as a result of the uneven wind and transport.

The only way to deal with unevenly wound rawstock is to rewind it slowly and carefully.
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#7 Lav Bodnaruk

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:41 PM

The only way to deal with unevenly wound rawstock is to rewind it slowly and carefully.

Hi Dominic, Ill do exactly that!
Mr Christiansen told me that the 'tap' on the table would definitely damage the stock, and that he thinks since the film was dismissed as 'uneven' it might be already unusable! I was given the film by him to perform tests;

It would appear that none of my short ends stuff seems to be worthy of a shoot... thanks for your post!
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