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DIT? 1st AC?


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#1 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 02:58 AM

I was hired today for a show shooting on the F900 with Digitprimes, I will be B-Cam 1st AC, but he also mentioned I'd be the DIT. Needing another Job, I didn't mention that I'm not trained nor experienced as a DIT, he never asked, nor was it mentioned before hand. But as it goes, he told me tonight that I'd be B 1st, and the DIT.

I am not even fully sure of what my responsibilities would be as a DIT. If anyone has any advice, concerns, guidence in any way to help me through my 4th Feature I'd be very greatful.

Also, Is it common to have the 1st AC as the DIT? I've only done 4 features, 3 of whitch were HD other S16, and verious other projects on HD and have never been asked.

Thanks!
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 06:56 AM

Hi,

Oh, you're going to have fun!

I suspect you will be in a slightly better situation with regards to the rest of the crew by being on both sides of the fence at once, since it's my experience that people can be highly suspicious and distrustful of such a comparatively new position.

It really depends what you're going to be asked to achieve. Read the manual, it's far from terrifying.

Phil
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#3 Tim J Durham

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 08:09 AM

Hi,

Oh, you're going to have fun!

I suspect you will be in a slightly better situation with regards to the rest of the crew by being on both sides of the fence at once, since it's my experience that people can be highly suspicious and distrustful of such a comparatively new position.

It really depends what you're going to be asked to achieve. Read the manual, it's far from terrifying.

Phil

He's going to have to do more than read the manual if the DP or director hands him a photo and says "set the camera up like this. We need to start in 20 minutes".

Make sure you know well in advance how they want it to look so you have time to find out how to make it look that way. The F900s have extremely complicated menus and on-set with actors looking at you is no place to make that discovery.
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 09:18 AM

I'm not sure I'd call it "extremely complicated", and if the DP wants to make the DIT set the camera up on set with the actors looking on, that's his problem, not the DIT's.

Twenty minutes should be enough to get something basic into it, but it depends where you are. You can guesstimate looking at a production picture, but really you want to be in a studio somewhere with decent monitoring and lighting.

Obviously, you never get this.

Phil
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#5 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 23 November 2006 - 01:16 PM

Thanks for the The replies, I will go through the manual, I've worked with the F900 a few times before, but have never really messed with the scene files. WE start Prep on Tuesday, this is when I will discuss it with the DP and discuss the situation. The Rate isn't the best, so I highly doubt he's expecting a Trained person for the DIT work. I'm hoping to have this all figured out by the time prep is done!

I agree, if he hands me a picture and say's make it look like this meanwhile actors are before me onlooking I will a bit stressed out over it. He does'nt seem the type.

Thanks again for the response gentlemen.

HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
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#6 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:00 PM

You'll do fine. The manual will be helpful but the prep will be a better chance to straighten everything out and figure out what you need. It's not as bad as Phil says. I know it seems weird to wing it at the checkout but after all, it is an opportunity for everybody to figure everything out ahead of time so that when you're out there shooting, you can [hopefully] avoid major problems.
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#7 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:43 PM

Hi,

I didn't say it was difficult, I said to make sure of certain things. In fact I'd say exactly the opposite - it's really not that difficult at all.

The issue with monitoring is that if you do not look at it in a somewhat controlled environment, you can end up with something that looks OK thought shooting and find you've totally stuffed it when you try to film it out, or whatever. Caution and restraint are prudent.

Phil
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#8 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:48 PM

thanks again for your replies. Unfortunately I got a call today, as it turns out, One producerw as saying one thing to the DP and another Producer saying another, meaning they don't actually have funds to hire me, or have a 2nd Camera (nuts! they are shooting a feature with One camera in 16 Days!) Sort of a bummer actually. it is what it is, if anyone's got a project going on, need an AC let me know!

thanks again everyone,
Allen Achterberg
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#9 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:02 PM

Sorry to hear you lost the job. I was looking forward to reading the stories of how you managed to pull focus at "B" camera while also controlling the iris on both "A" and "B". I'm not sure how anyone could think that someone could be a 1st and a DIT at the same time.
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#10 Allen Achterberg

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:33 PM

It would have been an interesting journey none the less. A friend by the name of Jay Holben said it's actually not Uncommon for a 1st to substitute as the DIT, but definately not supposed to be like that.

got some old 5279, I think I'm going to go experiment with it since I've got free time now.

All the Best!
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#11 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 04:23 PM

A friend by the name of Jay Holben said it's actually not Uncommon for a 1st to substitute as the DIT, but definately not supposed to be like that.

All the Best!

See, that just doesn't make sense to me. A DIT doesn't have time to deal with 1sting, and vice versa. I think what your friend is saying is that sometimes the 1st has to set the camera up when there isn't a DIT. I've certainly seen that happen on more than one occassion. But a real DIT is trapped in a blacked out tent in front of a monitor painting the camera all day.
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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 05:31 PM

Hi,

I'm a bit concerned by this concept of someone sitting there, effectively grading the whole time. You're either going to get grotesque inconsistencies (which are hard to fix due to the nature of the recording) or exactly what you'd have got if you'd set it up in prep and gone with it.

Very cautious about this stuff.

Phil
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#13 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 05:48 AM

Hi,

I'm a bit concerned by this concept of someone sitting there, effectively grading the whole time. You're either going to get grotesque inconsistencies (which are hard to fix due to the nature of the recording) or exactly what you'd have got if you'd set it up in prep and gone with it.

Very cautious about this stuff.

Phil


It certainly introduces a debate as to the DIT's relationship with the DP. Unless they're just going to set up the camera menus to a prearranged setting a DIT should be trained and experienced in the job.

On the actual shoot the 1st AC usually won't have time to make adjustments because they're too busy setting up cameras for the next shot. Checking the back focus during lens changes (or worse with some cameras) seems to give enough headaches without adding being a DIT at the same time.
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#14 Tim J Durham

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 07:39 AM

Hi,

I'm a bit concerned by this concept of someone sitting there, effectively grading the whole time. You're either going to get grotesque inconsistencies (which are hard to fix due to the nature of the recording) or exactly what you'd have got if you'd set it up in prep and gone with it.

Very cautious about this stuff.

Phil

I have to say, if there is only one camera involved, it can't be too strenuous (I wouldn't think) but as you move the camera there are adjustments to the flares atleast that need to be made. I've only ever DIT'ed on multi-camera shoots like concerts, talk shows and sports with wildly inconsistent lighting and it can be a very strenuous job.
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#15 Stephen Williams

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 09:14 AM

Hi,

I'm a bit concerned by this concept of someone sitting there, effectively grading the whole time. You're either going to get grotesque inconsistencies (which are hard to fix due to the nature of the recording) or exactly what you'd have got if you'd set it up in prep and gone with it.

Very cautious about this stuff.

Phil


Hi Phil,

Good point.

I like the Viper in Film Stream mode, there is nothing to adjust except shutter angle, T stop & focus!

Stephen
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#16 Ken Minehan

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 12:41 AM

hey guys,
This may wound like a ridiculous question. But what is a DIT, and what do they do?
Ken Minehan
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#17 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 04:56 AM

hey guys,
This may wound like a ridiculous question. But what is a DIT, and what do they do?
Ken Minehan


They are a Digital Imaging Technician.

You can check out what they do on Peter Gray's web site:

http://jkor.com/peter/engineer.html
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