Jump to content


Photo

General Tips and Tricks


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Brandon McCormick

Brandon McCormick
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 30 posts
  • Director

Posted 24 November 2006 - 10:02 PM

OK, so maybe not everyone will be willing to come forth with their "tricks of the trade", but I'm hoping for just a few good ones. There may be no "magic bullets" here, but I know people have that one thing they always do to make great work. It could be any little thing from lighting to camera settings, but what is your little secret that you employ when it's time to make the magic happen?
  • 0

#2 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 20069 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 24 November 2006 - 10:18 PM

There are a hundred little tricks we all use but they tend to be problem-specific. For example, I've always had problems with the classic "close-up of person looking through a crack in the door" in terms of avoiding a front light to get around the slit of the door. My solution has been to backlight the person or at least hit the wall on the other side of the door and let the bounce-back light the person's face (if they don't lean too far forward.)
  • 0

#3 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 25 November 2006 - 01:09 AM

There are a hundred little tricks we all use but they tend to be problem-specific. For example, I've always had problems with the classic "close-up of person looking through a crack in the door" in terms of avoiding a front light to get around the slit of the door. My solution has been to backlight the person or at least hit the wall on the other side of the door and let the bounce-back light the person's face (if they don't lean too far forward.)


You don't greenscreen the person into the crack? Then you could light them perfectly. Hmm, I think I'm gonna go try that...
  • 0

#4 Paul Bruening

Paul Bruening

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 2858 posts
  • Producer
  • Oxford, Mississippi

Posted 27 November 2006 - 12:14 AM

Hello,

I still can't get enough of my reflectors. I get one inch, single-sided, foam sheets. They're silver foil on one side and white styro on the other. They come in 8' by 4' sheets from building material businesses for about $8.00 to $10.00 per sheet. I let one or two of my gorilla crew guys hold them. I can't even begin to exclaim how much trouble and cost they have saved me in adding one or two additional lighting angles to an otherwise unfillably bright sun light.

Paul
  • 0

#5 James Erd

James Erd
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 187 posts
  • Director
  • Palo Alto, CA

Posted 27 November 2006 - 09:56 PM

It's just a little thing, but I like to avoid using the exposure calculator on my incident light meter. So I make a quick chart that has all f stops corresponding to the illumination. It's quicker, easier to read and less things to do. I'm one of those people who doesn't like to rush, but I feel bad if others are waiting on me. Doing this leaves me more time to catch other mistakes I might be making.
  • 0


Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Glidecam

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies