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Panaflex 16mm


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#1 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 06:42 PM

I'm familiar with 35mm Panaflex cameras but not so much with this one. Is there anything unique to this camera that I should be aware of? I have a job coming up with it and even though I do get a checkout day, I guess I'm just kinda curious. It doesn't seem to me like it's that different from its bigger brothers and sisters. Am I right? Please feel free to share practical advice and horror stories, or maybe a haiku.
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#2 Dan Goulder

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 06:54 PM

maybe a haiku.

Its name is Elaine
Because they don?t call it Jane
They use it in Maine
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#3 Zachary Vex

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 07:47 PM

There's a bunch of info here:

http://www.cinematog...isionElaine.htm

on edit: sorry, I'm not very good with haikus.

Edited by Zachary Vex, 25 November 2006 - 07:48 PM.

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#4 Dan Goulder

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 07:58 PM

sorry, I'm not very good with haikus.

As you can see from the above post, neither am I.
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#5 Nathan Milford

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 08:03 PM

Bring extra fuses.
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#6 Zachary Vex

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 08:10 PM

But at least you tried. Okay, here goes:

at the Panastore
there on the film loading door
Elaine waits for us
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#7 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 09:05 PM

It?s more or less the same thing as a GII, just make sure you have extra fuses (as was said before), as they tend to pop if the camera jams.

Also, try not to let the mags roll out as that tends to pop the fuse, and supposedly the mags have light leaks if there is no film in the feed side of mag well.
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#8 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 11:47 PM

Okay, thank you all. I'm sure I'll be fine. That was beautiful poetry, by the way. When I was studying for the Local 600 test, I made up stupid little haikus to remember things about particular formulas and cameras. I would then sit on the A train and mutter them to myself in order to memorize them. I'm not sure why, but people started staring. Anyway, I digress.

Let's all pray for me
And hope nothing goes wrong or
it's Pana-phone time.

After this job's done
New York forum members can
meet me in a bar...

:lol:
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#9 Satsuki Murashige

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 03:44 AM

Hi Annie,

Just curious, but is this for Panavision's New Filmmaker program? I worked on one of those last year that used an Elaine. We don't see Panavision gear up here very often, so it was a kind of a big deal. I tried to sneak a sniff of those sweet Panny mags, but they wouldn't let me. :)
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#10 Rik Andino

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 04:12 AM

It?s more or less the same thing as a GII, just make sure you have extra fuses (as was said before), as they tend to pop if the camera jams.

Also, try not to let the mags roll out as that tends to pop the fuse, and supposedly the mags have light leaks if there is no film in the feed side of mag well.


With all that you're saying about this camera
Why would anyone wanna shoot with it?

An SR3 or XTRProd sound like way better options.

Are Primos that much better than Zeiss glass to warrant the use of this camera?
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#11 Kevin Zanit

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 04:37 AM

Well that is a valid question.

A lot of it has to do with what rental house you like to work with. I love going out of Panavision, and every time I don't go out of Panavision, I am reminded quickly why I like Panavision so much.

Primos are very nice lenses, there are very few lenses in the world that compete (attn: those who will get pissed at that comment, remember, I said few lenses, not no lenses). All that said, I have never seen an Elaine with a PL or 35mm PV mount, though I think they exist.

I also like that most Panavision accessories are compatible with the Elaine, and that it sort of follows the Panavision "system".

I have worked with SRIIs and SRIIIs and those are great cameras. I think the viewing system in the Elaine is better, especially the long eyepiece as it is not an eyepiece extension (that cuts light), but an entirely different optic.

I am once again not positive on this, but I seem to remember the camera will take behind the lens filters which is a nice feature, especially because of how dim the viewfinder can be.

Also, the camera has a completely variable shutter that can be adjusted in shot.

I am sure there are more pros and cons I am missing, I haven't shot with that camera in years, but I do like it.


Kevin Zanit
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#12 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 11:51 AM

Just an update on the Pany 16 shoot...yes, it is from the New Filmmaker program. The film is called "Landlocked" and it's pretty low-budget but it's a great script. We've got a little break and then we're back in on Friday until Sunday. Personally, I'm having a great time. I love working with Panavision cameras (ha ha, don't tell Arri!). I was a little stressed about the reliability of the camera at first but once you figure out its quirks, it's not a big deal. I blew 3 fuses so far...but then I noticed that they tend to blow easier if battery power drops low, like below 26 volts. So now whenever we reload, I make it a priority to change the battery and we haven't had any issues. The viewing system is not that good especially with the long eyepiece, but being that it's a 25-year old super 16 camera, I'm not really surprised. Being familiar with the Panavision 35 system is great because like Kevin said, all the accessories are the same. Both Pany New York and Woodland Hills have been really, really helpful as far as sending some extra fuses, the ground glass we requested, and replacing our monitor which was malfunctioning the first two days. I'm really grateful for their help and I'm thrilled to be working with Panavision again. All in all, I am actually pretty happy with the camera. It's not the nightmare everyone was telling me about, and I didn't really think it would be in the first place. Whenever people warn me about a certain camera, I always just wait until I can experience it for myself before I draw any conclusions. If you go into the job hating the gear, it's just gonna work against you in the end! So yes, I cursed Elaine out after the first day, but now it's safe to say that we are good friends. :P
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