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Canon Fluorite 12-120 Macrozoom


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#1 Ian Marks

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Posted 26 November 2006 - 11:52 PM

I'd like to hear from anyone who has experience with this lens. Is it any good? How does it compare to the Angenieux and Zeiss lenses of the same era (mid-late 80's)?

Also, I seem to recall reading somewhere that someone had successfully modified this lens for Super-16 use. Or did I just imaging this?

Thanks in advance....
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#2 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 12:28 AM

It's a great lens IMO, produces a crisp image, for a Canon that is, i breathes a bit but works decently overall.
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#3 Mike Rizos

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 09:10 PM

I too, would like to hear about this lens. The only info I can offer is that production started earlier than mid to late 80's. I have a price list from 1980, and it lists the lens as T2.7 for $3,020. The 12-120 Ang lists for $4,085.
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#4 Ian Marks

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 10:35 PM

Thanks, Kenny and Mike. I can remember magazine ads for this lens from when I was a movie-crazy kid. I think the magazine was "Filmmakers Newsletter" or something like that, or it might have been American Cinematographer. I remember the fluorite glass and macro focusing feature being the big selling points. I wish I had a copy of one of those ads now - or better yet, a copy of the original instructions that came with the lens.

My lens arrived this afternoon (all the way to L.A. from Scotland, of all places). It's got an Arri bayonet mount and it's now mounted on my ACL via a Les Bosher adapter. It's an impressively heavy lens, much more substantial than the Angenieux 9.5-57mm that has been living on the camera. It's got a 72mm thread so it takes all the same filters and hoods as the equivalent Angenieux.

I'm pleased that it's in very nice shape, too. What interests me most is that macro feature - does anyone know exactly how it works? I can see that there's ring that can be engaged when the lens is at its widest position. Beyond that, I'm not so sure. Also, I'm wondering if I can use this lens in conjuction with a supplementary wide angle lens like an aspheron, or the Nizo UW. I've used these with Super-8 cameras with a macro focusing zoom, so it should work here, right? Any thoughts?
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#5 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 12:29 AM

Thanks, Kenny and Mike. I can remember magazine ads for this lens from when I was a movie-crazy kid. I think the magazine was "Filmmakers Newsletter" or something like that, or it might have been American Cinematographer. I remember the fluorite glass and macro focusing feature being the big selling points. I wish I had a copy of one of those ads now - or better yet, a copy of the original instructions that came with the lens.

My lens arrived this afternoon (all the way to L.A. from Scotland, of all places). It's got an Arri bayonet mount and it's now mounted on my ACL via a Les Bosher adapter. It's an impressively heavy lens, much more substantial than the Angenieux 9.5-57mm that has been living on the camera. It's got a 72mm thread so it takes all the same filters and hoods as the equivalent Angenieux.

I'm pleased that it's in very nice shape, too. What interests me most is that macro feature - does anyone know exactly how it works? I can see that there's ring that can be engaged when the lens is at its widest position. Beyond that, I'm not so sure. Also, I'm wondering if I can use this lens in conjuction with a supplementary wide angle lens like an aspheron, or the Nizo UW. I've used these with Super-8 cameras with a macro focusing zoom, so it should work here, right? Any thoughts?

hah, i AM a movie-crazy kid and now that this good stuff isn't bank anymore it's available and nobody wants it so it's the people like us who keep this stuff in good use.
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#6 Martin Yernazian

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 02:12 AM

hah, i AM a movie-crazy kid and now that this good stuff isn't bank anymore it's available and nobody wants it so it's the people like us who keep this stuff in good use.


Hey I want to see a picture of this lens...
Also how much did you buy it for?

Best
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#7 Kenny N Suleimanagich

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 02:39 AM

Hey I want to see a picture of this lens...
Also how much did you buy it for?

Best

I dont have any pictures, however i bought it with a CP-16R/A package where i got the camera, recelled battery, charger, and 2 magazines along with this lens in a steal of a package for $1000
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#8 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 03:33 PM

I'm pleased that it's in very nice shape, too. What interests me most is that macro feature - does anyone know exactly how it works? I can see that there's ring that can be engaged when the lens is at its widest position. Beyond that, I'm not so sure. Also, I'm wondering if I can use this lens in conjuction with a supplementary wide angle lens like an aspheron, or the Nizo UW. I've used these with Super-8 cameras with a macro focusing zoom, so it should work here, right? Any thoughts?


Better than than the comprable angie.
Canon had a supplimentary wide angle attachment used in conjunction with the macrofocusing.

The macro works by moving the entire lens for focusing.
You can use the macro for a follow focus as you zoom.
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#9 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 03:56 PM

The macro works by moving the entire lens for focusing.
You can use the macro for a follow focus as you zoom.


as you zoom the focus shifts, but the size of the plane of focus remains the same.

So if someone is walking toward camera, start on him at the long end and zoom out maintaining the same size shot as he gets closer and the focus will stay on him.

The Canon wide angle attachment converts it to 9mm.
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#10 Ian Marks

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 05:34 PM

as you zoom the focus shifts, but the size of the plane of focus remains the same.

So if someone is walking toward camera, start on him at the long end and zoom out maintaining the same size shot as he gets closer and the focus will stay on him.

The Canon wide angle attachment converts it to 9mm.


This pseudo-follow-focus sounds like it might be useful, although this kind of shot sounds like what I used to see on TV a lot in the 70's and 80's - Dr. Welby or Magnum would walk toward the camera, conversing with that week's co-star, and the camera would zoom out slowly to maintain the actors' image size in the frame. Still, it's nice to know that I could do it if I wanted to.

Leo, is the Canon wide angle attachment the same as the one for the Scoopic M and MS?

Last night I sifted through the boxes in my closet and came up with a few wide angle attachments acquired over the years. One was a Century Optics "Value Series" fisheye adapter with a 75mm clamp-on fitting (perfect for the Canon with its 72mm front thread). When I tried it on the Canon, it had too much barrel distortion for my taste (not surprising - it's a fisheye adapter), and it vignettes. Good for a POV shot of someone's view through a peep-hole, but not much else. The second was a Century Optics "Value Series" .6X wide angle adapter, with the same 75mm clamp-on fitting. Unfortunately, this one has an adapter ring inside the clamping mechanism to fit it to smaller lenses, and I don't know how to get it out without risking damage to the glass. I'll have to drop by Century Optics and see if they can remove it for me. The third was a Schneider Aspheron with a 77mm threaded fitting. This thing is huge, with a protruding front element like a big eyeball. I have no idea what it was originally intended to go on - maybe a really high-end Nizo Super-8. I put it on the Canon with a 72-77mm adapter, and it looked like the equivalent of maybe an 8mm lens. Straight lines remained nice and straight, and I didn't see any vignetting. Unfortunately this Aspheron has a slight scratch to the inside of the rear element, and depending upon the shot and how the light is hitting the lens, you can sometimes see it - depth of field is that great. Of course, if it didn't have the scratch, I wouldn't have been able to buy it in the first place. Ideally, I'd like to have the Canon attachment, but I'm sure they're scarce and not cheap - probably more than I paid for the zoom.
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#11 Leo Anthony Vale

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 04:02 PM

Leo, is the Canon wide angle attachment the same as the one for the Scoopic M and MS?


I think so, since it could also be used on the 12.5-75/1.8.

Those faux-dolly zooms were used quite a bit. Quicker than laying tracks.
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FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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