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Using un-color corrected k40 outside to gain extra stop?


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#1 grantsmith

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 11:42 AM

Hi,

I'll be shooting something on my remaining k40 16mm in the next month. If the light starts to go can I shoot without the correction filter to gain some extra stop?

Could the lab correct it for me or is it a telecine job?

What would the difference be if corrected in post rather than in-camera? Would the reds be over-saturated?

Thanks
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#2 Bryan Darling

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Posted 28 November 2006 - 01:32 PM

Hi,

I'll be shooting something on my remaining k40 16mm in the next month. If the light starts to go can I shoot without the correction filter to gain some extra stop?

Could the lab correct it for me or is it a telecine job?

What would the difference be if corrected in post rather than in-camera? Would the reds be over-saturated?

Thanks


I've done this many times when I had a camera without a filter. You can fix it in telecine pretty easily, you could even through a filter over the projector to cool it down- if you are going to project it. Basically, the majority of your color information is in the warm/red region. As to how much depends also on the scene/subject matter. So the cooler the colors are the less it will seem to be real warm, if that makes sense to you. I would say do it if you are going to telecine and correct out, or for effect. I can't tell you that it will be perfect once corrected.
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#3 Jon Kukla

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 09:18 AM

You might want to look into getting an LLD if you can - it partially compensates, especially in the less easily correctable ranges - without having a significant filter factor (ie no compensation needed).
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#4 Sam Wells

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 10:17 AM

This is Kodachrome, not ECN. It can go very blue in this case. (a kind of cool look in itself, but..)
I'm not sure it will correct back to normal easily, it's quite a bit of contrast you're dealing with.

An LLD might help.

-Sam
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#5 Bryan Darling

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 01:41 PM

This is Kodachrome, not ECN. It can go very blue in this case. (a kind of cool look in itself, but..)
I'm not sure it will correct back to normal easily, it's quite a bit of contrast you're dealing with.

An LLD might help.

-Sam


Actually it will go yellow/red not blue, at least if you are shooting in daylight. It is designed for tungsten balanced lights.
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#6 Sam Wells

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 01:27 AM

No it won't.

That said, direct sun at a very low angle can be quite warm & could look nice. Skies will tend to be excessively blue compared to using the daylight filter.

-Sam
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#7 Bryan Darling

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 03:12 PM

No it won't.

That said, direct sun at a very low angle can be quite warm & could look nice. Skies will tend to be excessively blue compared to using the daylight filter.

-Sam

I stand corrected. It will go blue rather than red without the 85 filter. I apologize.

Edited by Bryan Darling, 01 December 2006 - 03:16 PM.

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#8 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 12:08 AM

You might want to look into getting an LLD if you can - it partially compensates, especially in the less easily correctable ranges - without having a significant filter factor (ie no compensation needed).


OK stupid question, what's an LLD?
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#9 Sam Wells

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 11:11 AM

Hey, I'm not offended !


OK stupid question, what's an LLD?


LLD has a UV cutoff preventing overexposure of the film's blue sensitive layer by excess UV. Unlike a #85, no transmission loss & can make correction easier.

My observation is Kodachrome is particularly sensitive to UV; modern color negs not so much.

-Sam
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#10 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 03:57 PM

If the light starts to go can I shoot without the correction filter to gain some extra stop?


That's exactly what Nestor Almendros did on "Days of Heaven". A majority of that film was shot during "golden hour" on tungsten film with an 85 filter. Then when they needed an extra stop they just took out the 85 and resumed shooting. I'm sure the lab will be able to match your footage.
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#11 Sam Wells

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 11:10 AM

The problem is, Kodachrome is difficult enough as it is to print from even with proper filtration.

For a "look" sure pull the 85 if you want.

-Sam
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#12 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 02:32 PM

A reversal film like KODACHROME film has MUCH less latitude than color negative film. So shooting without the proper color correction filter will be much harder to correct during printing or telecine.
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