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European light in Northern Australia


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#1 G McMahon

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 11:52 AM

Looking at shooting some daylight exteriors, Black and White. They want to have a European feel (the piece is a parody). Were nearly in summer here as well. I am thinking of lowing contrast and exposing or slightly under exposing the key (sun) and kicking actors with big bounce. May be using some harder reflectors a stop under or so to give a subtle punch.

Any suggestion in approach or is this look unattainable with the conditions. Shooting HVX200.

Thanks all,
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#2 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 01:00 PM

It all depends on what your definition of "European light" is. Any films you can reference?

But anyways, since you're shooting HD there really isn't too much you have to worry about color wise WHILE shooting. Just shoot it normal, probably with some high contrast "European" shadows then adjust the color palette in post for your "European" look.

:)
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#3 G McMahon

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 05:18 PM

I will try to clarify. Am shooting in an environment with harsh sunlight (high contrast) and trying to create the look more of autumn, subtle highlight to shadow graduations. The final product is black and white.

Thank you all,
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#4 Ken Minehan

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 09:38 PM

Hello. Do you mean the lighting conditions typical of french/English films, where the exteriors are very diffused and have a greyish tone. From what i can see of European Films, much of their lighting is very beautiful and soft. Even the exteriors.

HVX 200 is a good camera, but it has it's limitations with reducing the contrast. You will have to do more in post.

On location, i recommend you to place a 20 x 20 grid (or something thinner depending on how much you prefer to diffuse) to diffuse the sun light. This will definitely soften out the harsh kick from the sun and lessen the contrast. You can bounce a soft fill from the other side to even out the lighting even more. But to acheive the European feel, keep it soft. After you achieve the right exposure, you may have to grade a bit to achieve that european light feel.

Or you can wait for a really big cloud to come over. The best diffuser in the world. haha.

I think a good reference to the feel you are talking about would be "Schindlers List". right?

Anyway good luck
Hope this helps
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#5 G McMahon

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 11:32 PM

I think a good reference to the feel you are talking about would be "Schindlers List". right?


Spot on. Don't like to mention a parody on that film but thats the one.

Muslin is too thick to have over the top isn't it? I wish we were shooting today, overcast.

Thank you,

Graeme
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#6 Ken Minehan

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 09:51 PM

Hi Graeme.
Yep you are right. after thinking about it i realise i made a mistake. Grid would be too thick. A thinner diffusion like a silk will be good.

I am also from Australia, and i realise the intensity of the sun we have to deal with. You have a difficult job ahead, but i think will be very rewarding if you achieve the look you're going for. It would be a good idea to also speak with a colourist before your shoot. I often speak to the colourist to ask what kind of footage they need to achieve the look i want.

They can tell you to underexpose/overexpose, or darken off clouds, etc etc.

With this kind of info, i think you will feel more confident when shooting your project. I sure do.

Good luck mate, would love to see a still frame once your done.

Ken Minehan
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#7 Kim Sargenius

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 07:20 PM

I am also from Australia, and i realise the intensity of the sun we have to deal with.



"Between the hours of eleven 'till three, stay under a tree" :D


Shoot your close ups / tighter shots during these times - a lot here will depend on your ability to choose your background so it won't look too harsh and bright compared to your subject.

Shoot wider shots in the early morning or evening when the light is softer.



HTH,

Kim
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#8 G McMahon

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 07:52 PM

I ended up exposing or slightly underexposing the incident sunlight, and punching hard reflectors. I will try to post in some shots.
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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 08:44 PM

Hi,

> typical of french/English films, ..... very diffused ..... a greyish tone.

And you think that's good?

Completely featureless, shadowless, tedious photography?

I spend my entire professional life failing to get away from the awful, aching grey glow.

Phil
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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