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Television studio pedestal dollies for film work


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#1 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 01:45 AM

I have a couple of old television studio pedestals that a got a while back. They have very heavy duty heads, can dolly, and are counterbalanced to raise and lower the camera (crane up and down a foot or two). They move pretty smoothly and are very quiet. I was thinking about using them for some of my interior shots we planned to do in the studio. Has anyone ever tried using these things in a 35mm production?
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#2 Hal Smith

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 02:36 AM

I have a couple of old television studio pedestals that a got a while back.

Hi Capt.

I haven't used them with 35mm gear but many moons ago underneath large RCA color cameras - TK43's. One caveat is they're designed to operate on a dead flat, smooth studio floor, they get real unwieldly on anything else. Otherwise they're pretty nice to use with their ability to steer or crab, etc. I bet one would make an awesome foundation for a big jib setup. :)

Hal
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 02:45 AM

I'm sure some sitcoms were shot in 35mm on pedestals. You need a video tap to operate, pull-focus, etc. just like a video camera on a pedestal. You run some risk when operating without looking through the camera; you might not catch a soft shot, etc.
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#4 Thanasis Diamantopoulos

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 09:24 AM

I have a couple of old television studio pedestals that a got a while back. They have very heavy duty heads, can dolly, and are counterbalanced to raise and lower the camera (crane up and down a foot or two). They move pretty smoothly and are very quiet. I was thinking about using them for some of my interior shots we planned to do in the studio. Has anyone ever tried using these things in a 35mm production?


Hi James

I have used in past for a feature film a studio pedestal in interiors ofsmall house that we couldn't use a dolly.
I used it with my 2c camera in a non sync shooting the results where excellend. If they can crane smooth you will save alot of money. I used it with out controls with wide or normal lenses. Just use a video assist and a lcd monitor for the camera man.
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#5 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 03:31 PM

I've got the Kinor 35H so a video tap is gonna be a pain to get but I'm determined to have one fabricated before pricipal photography begins, so we'll see what I can come up with. I do have the long viewfinder if that would help.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 01:12 AM

I've got the Kinor 35H so a video tap is gonna be a pain to get but I'm determined to have one fabricated before pricipal photography begins, so we'll see what I can come up with. I do have the long viewfinder if that would help.


You stand quite far back when operating a pedestal - there's no way to keep an eye to an eyepiece, hence why you operate with a video monitor at the back of the camera.
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#7 James Steven Beverly

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 11:05 PM

I figured it probably wouldn't work but I thought I'd ask. I email Steve Morton about a video tap I saw on commiecam It sits parrallel to the camera base plate then swings down out of the way for loading. I like it because it utilizes the original video tap port that is built into the camera. The only modification it requires if the angled mirror behind the video tap door has to be changed to a partially silvered beamsplitter mirror. He sells them for about a grand. I've spent so much right now It may be a little while before I can afford that though.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

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