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About S8 cartriges


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#1 JB Guillot

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 12:51 PM

Hi guys,

I'm a newbie on this forum, I've been shooting on S8 for about a year and a half but always on K40 so I didn't really bothered about athers films or technical stuff about S8.

I've read loads of posts on different forums, I've tried to understand lots of things but there is still something I don't get : notches on cartriges !

I found many things on Super8wiki and others on another websote (I can't tell which on) where I found this pic :
Posted Image

Here is what I understand :
- sensitivity of the film is represented buy the higher notch (good explanation on super8wiki)
- lower notch is for wratten 85 filter

What I don't get is the use of this lower notch as far as you can select on your camera if you're on Daylight (wratten filter "activated") or Tungsten (filter disabled)...

My question could be even more specific : I'd like to try Plus-X or 100D reels but both need to be exposed with Daylight settings but WITHOUT filter :blink: sounds a bit problematic in my opinion...

I think there's another element I forgot and that's the "lightness sensor" (why can't I right a proper english when it becomes technical <_< ...sorry I'm just another European who can't speak English properly :P ).

If you cound please help me understanding hos this stuff works...waiting for your knowledge :unsure:

Keep Super 8 evil ! :D
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#2 Clive Tobin

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 10:39 PM

...What I don't get is the use of this lower notch as far as you can select on your camera if you're on Daylight (wratten filter "activated") or Tungsten (filter disabled)...

Basically if the cartridge has no notch, for daylight film, the conversion filter is always out of the light path no matter how the user sets his filter switch. This is because the film needs no filter in daylight, and if it were present accidentally with tungsten light the film would come out *very* red and this would always be wrong.
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#3 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 09:55 PM

Basically if the cartridge has no notch, for daylight film, the conversion filter is always out of the light path no matter how the user sets his filter switch. This is because the film needs no filter in daylight, and if it were present accidentally with tungsten light the film would come out *very* red and this would always be wrong.

But only if your camera has a filter notch detector. Some cameras only relly on an external swith for switching the filter in or out. If your camera needs a filter key or a filter screw, then it will no doubt have a filter notch reader. If it has an external sliding switch, then it may or may not have a filter notch reader. Have a look inside the film compartment where the filter notch makes contact with the inside of the camera. Is there a little pin that gets pushed in by un notched film like Plus-x? Then it has a filter notch reader. Otherwise, you need to put the filter switch in the 'tungsten' (bulb) position as this is the position for no filter.
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#4 Terry Mester

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 01:10 AM

Hi guys,

I think there's another element I forgot and that's the "lightness sensor"

If you cound please help me understanding hos this stuff works...waiting for your knowledge :unsure:

Keep Super 8 evil ! :D


The "Light Sensor" on the Camera is for the "Auto Aperture" which only works when you select the Auto Aperture setting instead of a specific f-stop. When you're outside, and without film in the Camera, set the Aperture to 'auto' and look into the Lens as you point it to the bright sky and then to shade. You'll see it move. It's much safer to film with Auto Aperture set on. If the built-in UV Filter has scratches (as it does on my camera), you need to insert a screw in the top button hole to keep the Filter out.

Edited by Terry Mester, 20 December 2006 - 01:11 AM.

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#5 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 08:45 AM

Why is the daylight filter disabled on the V200T cardridge?!? I have to make the little hole in the cardr. myself when I want to shoot daylight with the internal filter.

With V200T on Nizo 6080, the filter stays swung out, even with cameraswitch set to daylight (the little sun-picto). Only with a modified cardridge I have the choice...
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#6 Hal Smith

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 11:55 AM

If a given Super-8 camera won't recognize tungsten film for use outdoors, why not simply use an 85B filter on the lens? My Nizo 4056's internal daylight filter is a bit blue anyhow on bright sun shots, probably because it's an 85 (3400K to Daylight) not an 85B (3200K to Daylight). I use an external 85B filter on mid-day shots with EK64T, and would do the same with Vision negative films, though with negative films the 85/85B difference is trivial to correct in timing.
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#7 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 20 December 2006 - 12:51 PM

If a given Super-8 camera won't recognize tungsten film for use outdoors, why not simply use an 85B filter on the lens? My Nizo 4056's internal daylight filter is a bit blue anyhow on bright sun shots, probably because it's an 85 (3400K to Daylight) not an 85B (3200K to Daylight). I use an external 85B filter on mid-day shots with EK64T, and would do the same with Vision negative films, though with negative films the 85/85B difference is trivial to correct in timing.



In addition to the above suggestion. If you are confused as to whether or not the 85 filter is being used or not, simply switch the filter switch from tungesten to sunlight while in the auto mode and see if the f-stop changes any. You should see the f-stop change if the filter is actually being moved, just make sure you have the camera trigger partially pushed in so that the camera is actually on.

If you move the switch back and forth and don't see an f-stop change, then one must determine if the filter is in all the time, or out all the time. To do this one can zoom the lens in and look through the front lens element and you should be able to see if the filter is there or not.
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