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Frame Rates Question


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#1 chris buddy

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 06:16 PM

Was hoping someone could help me out with the difference between 18 and 24FPS.
Whay is 18 frames per second the "normal" rate.
I am working with the Nizo s800. Thank you

sorry...just searched the forum and found the answers.
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#2 Alessandro Malfatti

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 07:02 PM

I suppose 18fps is the "normal" frame rate, because it was usually the standard, the projectors are fitted with 3-blade shutters, as to prevent flicker (unlike 16 or 35mm which have 2-blade shutters, for minimal light loss with 24fps)and with 18fps you got most out of a cartridge. To amateurs, who just filmed and projected some simple home movies, probably silent, it surely didn't matter if they were slower than cinema-standard, today it's different, I suppose, as you'd rather film on 24fps for telecine or blow-up. But that's basically the story, no need to use a faster film speed as to get more time out of a cartridge. I'm not quite sure if Sound Super8 used 24 or 18, though...
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#3 Clive Tobin

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Posted 01 December 2006 - 10:41 PM

... I'm not quite sure if Sound Super8 used 24 or 18, though...

Probably 99% of super-8 magnetic striped film was shot at 18 FPS, the same as silent film. Most cameras had only this speed and did not have 24 as an option.
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#4 Alessandro Malfatti

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 12:15 AM

I see, I wasn't sure if it needed a faster speed for sound, like for optical sound, but I guess since it is magnetic, this isn't a problem.
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#5 Bernhard Zitz

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 06:44 AM

Was hoping someone could help me out with the difference between 18 and 24FPS.

If you project right of a super8-projector 18fps is fine, if you go video 24fps is better for NTSC, 16 2/3fps and 25fps is better for PAL to avoid pulldown and speed issues...
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#6 André Bacher

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 11:49 AM

Hello,

another thing is the better sound quality @24fps!
If the film runs "faster" you can use more magnetic tape on the film at the same time which means you can use a bigger sound spectrum.
With 18fps around 70-10.000 Hz and with 24fps around 70-12.000 Hz

greetings,
André
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#7 Sean McHenry

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 11:54 AM

Interesting note, I was watching the trailers on the latest release of "In Cold Blood" and there was a trailer for "8mm" with Nick Cage. The VO of the announcer mentions the film was 8mm wide and run as 16 frames per second... huh?

I know better but you think they could have gotten the script right for the announcer. 9, 18, 24, 48, 54, etc but I have never heard of 8mm running at 16fps. Anyone else or was that just wrong?

Sean
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#8 Mark Dunn

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 12:10 PM

16fps was the standard silent rate for 8mm. Super-8 increased it to 18.
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#9 Clive Tobin

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 07:20 PM

16fps was the standard silent rate for 8mm. Super-8 increased it to 18.

Basically correct, however some 8mm cameras made starting around 1960 by some manufacturers were adjusted to run at 18 instead of 16. Nobody seems to be sure exactly when this was though.
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